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During the holiday season, many of us will be going to see a show. Whether it’s a movie at the cinema, or a live performance in a theater, here are some excellent tips to make the evening more enjoyable for everyone.

  • Get there thirty to forty-five minutes before it starts. This is important. For concerts and theatrical performances, they “open the house.” That means the doors are opened to allow the audience to find their seats and get all manner of talking out of the way before the show begins. It is also distracting to stage actors to have people attempt to find seats while they are trying to perform.
  • Make reservations. This mainly applies to theatrical shows and symphonic concerts. You may ask why, but the answer is simple. If you fail to reserve a ticket, then there is a chance the show will sell out. If it is a popular show, or a show that parents will want children to see, there is a good chance that the show will sell out. Some places will call you back to confirm the reservation. Also, if you realize that you cannot make the reservation, then call the box office and tell them ASAP. That way, the box office can open those seats up to other people. If you fail to reserve tickets, then do not blame the people working the box office. It is not their fault that you were idiotic and not make a reservation.
  • DO NOT TALK during the show. You may think your comment is funny, but the people around you will not. In a movie, it’s not as bad as a play. Also, just because you have a problem with the lead actor of the show, you may not want to say this because you don’t know if the people in front of you are friends of the actor or not.
  • Do not bring children under the age of four or five to see a show. Yes, it may be a good show for them to see, but if they end up crying or being fussy, you can bet that the actors and the other audience members will be unhappy and distracted. If it gets too bad, you may be asked to leave. If you take a child to a show, request to get aisle seats. This way, if the little bundle of joy is fussing, you can quietly get up and take the child out to the lobby and attempt to calm him or her down.
  • TURN OFF YOUR WIRELESS CELL PHONE! This is one, that even reminded by the director beforehand, people tend to forget. Nothing like watching a showing of the musical Shenandoah and hearing someone’s ringtone. Not only did the phone ring not fit the show, it also gained the ire of the actors on stage, and the audience members, not to mention the technical crew.
  • DO NOT TAKE PICTURES! The flash photography could blind the actor on stage, or it could also lead to the actor being injured and a lawsuit for you. It’s best to leave the camera at home. Also, if you are at a movie, and take out a camera, you could be reported as attempting to pirate the movie. This could land you in hot water with the MPAA, as well as in extreme cases, lead to jail time.