Google is taking another step in the fight against philshing and is authenticating any messages from eBay or PayPal. The system will try and prohibit fake messages from either company, from reaching consumers.

Gmail does its best to put a red warning label on phishing messages, but it can be hard for us to know sometimes and we can’t be 100% perfect. So, for the fraction of a time when Gmail misses it, you may end up squinting three times and turning the message sideways before suspecting that it’s phishing. Wouldn’t it be better if you never saw phishing messages at all, not even in your spam folder? Since 2004, we’ve been supporting email authentication standards including DomainKeys and DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) to verify senders and help identify forged messages. This is a key tool we use to keep spam out of Gmail inboxes. But these systems can only be effective when high volume senders consistently use them to sign their mail — if they’re sending some mail without signatures, it’s harder to tell whether it’s phishing or not. Well, I’m happy to announce today that by working with eBay and PayPal, we’re one step closer to stopping all phishing messages in their tracks.

Now any email that claims to come from “paypal.com” or “ebay.com” (and their international versions) is authenticated by Gmail and — here comes the important part — rejected if it fails to verify as actually coming from PayPal or eBay. That’s right: you won’t even see the phishing message in your spam folder. Gmail just won’t accept it at all. Conversely, if you get an message in Gmail where the “From” says “@paypal.com” or “@ebay.com,” then you’ll know it actually came from PayPal or eBay. It’s email the way it should be.

Authentication should be used by ALL ISP’s. It is time to start and take spam and phishing emails seriously and to protect the consumer from fake messages. To many people fall for the deceitful emails sending personal information to the bad guys.

What do you think?

Comments welcome.

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