I recently came across a new game from Armorgames.com called Warfare 1944 and decided to check it out.  I knew they had previously made a game called Warfare 1917, which focused on the bloody trench warfare style of fighting during that war – I found that game to be absolutely addicting and amazingly well put-together.

The 1944 game is very similar in that you have a set group of units to choose from and those units have a very limited number of commands they can carry out.  The units have different strengths and weaknesses and you must combine those in order to achieve your objectives.  You can fight on either the U.S. side or you fight as a German.  The action is simple, there is a playing field that you must cross in order to win, there are three rows to the battlefield, and you can send your units on either the upper, middle, or lower row.  The units cannot change what row they are in once they start so it is important to make sure that you don’t sent everyone down the same row as an advancing panzer.

In the 1917 game your troops advanced until they got to a trench; in the 1944 version they advance until they get to a wall or a hedge – once there they will take cover.  You can order your troops to lay down covering fire, throw grenades, or have an officer call in air strikes or artillery.  Your opponents can do the same.  Everything is based off of a points system; the more points you have the more troops and firepower you can bring to bear on an enemy.  The points seem to be arbitrary and replenish over time at a consistent rate so it is important to conserve your points if you need things like tanks or air strikes as they tend to cost quite a bit.

It is essentially the same game as 1917, only now there are three avenues of advancement rather than a single path.  The 1917 game feels more at home with the Flash game platform because it is simpler and easier to control.  Flash games that try to be too complex usually end up being unplayable or not enjoyable because the platform just doesn’t lend itself to complexities.  I think that is why zombie shoot-em-ups and throwing games are so popular when it comes to the Flash genre: simple is better.

In this case, the 1944 game seems to have reached a little bit too far.  The action is spread out over a couple of screens and you have to scroll between them to keep track of your squads and then scroll back to check on the enemy – it is very easy to lose track of the action.  Once you do get back to the action, your squads aren’t even that effective in battle; it is up to you to tell them to throw grenades or to lay down covering fire – something that happened automatically in the 1917 game.  I may have missed something, but I’ve never seen a single war movie where soldiers in battle had to wait for a command to throw a grenade at an enemy pelting them with machine gun fire.  All in all, the game is fun but not nearly as fun as Warfare 1917 – which is a game you should try out for yourself; it is a great way to kill 15 to 20 minutes.

Warfare 1944

Warfare 1917