That’s what the rumor was yesterday, and last night, when Charlie Sheen showed up on The Jimmy Kimmel Show, he looked tired, but in good spirits and certainly not in any way less than completely coherent.

Except possibly the kiss on the mouth with Kimmel.  {Jimmy didn’t look like he enjoyed it nearly as much as Charlie!}

It’s an amazing thing that Sheen showed up – or is it? While the actor was talking up his appearance schedule, and Mark Cuban was speaking about his knowledge of the Sheen upcoming tour, Charlie passed out t-shirts, ostensibly with the information about his upcoming tour.

Also yesterday came a notice from the Huffington Post about the tweets of someone, in a place of knowledge, that Charlie might be offered his job back on the biggest sitcom on television.

While it doesn’t surprise me, I do think that it is odd that the people at CBS have waited for this long to make the move toward Sheen and whomever is representing him.

Hollywoodlife.com also reports that discussions are ongoing. A show insider told the site, “The rumors are true — CBS wants Charlie back. They saw how popular his tour has become, how it has been selling out, and when word spread that he started talking to Fox about a late-night show, some decision-makers got a little antsy.”

So it appears to be a case of CBS not being sure they want to have Carlos back in the driver’s seat, but they want no other networks offering him transportation of any sort.

Then there is the unabashed self-promotion that for some might have failed, but for Sheen is getting people on board in record numbers, pumping their fists in a manner that says, “Perhaps this one time, the lone man can win against the unfair and corrupt system.” After all, Sheen was back and ready to work, it was the other side that decided he should be fired. Anyone that has been fired, fairly or perhaps a little unfairly, is wanting to see Charlie win one for the many who have lost against “the man.”

Since the firing, Sheen has found new sources of income: he’s working to make $1 million a year in Twitter endorsements, and he’s embarking on a North American live tour, for which he’ll earn $7 million

Hollywood is so amazingly weird.

After watching the real-life drama involving Jay Leno and David Letterman over who would replace Johnny Carson, and then seeing the reenactment of network stupidity at the highest levels again with the Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien theater-of-the-mind, it was not so strange to see the first part of the Charlie Sheen controversy, but now, this threatens to be the wildest thing to ever happen to people concerned with network television.

If Sheen goes back soon enough, it will be possible to put the whole incident behind everyone, and the only thing it will cost is money. If not, lives will change, fortunes will change, and perhaps television itself will change.

Because, three times is not going to be the charm, it just might be the straw that broke the camel’s back.

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