How to Shrink a Word Document

Shrink Your Word 2010 DocumentSome people subscribe to the philosophy that bigger is always better (and not all of them are from Texas). On the other side of the coin, there are those who say that less is more. To the former group, too much is never enough. To the latter group, be succinct and cut to the chase! If you have a document that’s slightly longer than one page, Microsoft Word 2010 has a handy dandy feature that lets you shrink the document to one page. When can such a thing come in handy? Well, if you’re printing it out, for one, you may want to save money on expensive ink and paper (or just conserve resources if you want to feel the warm fuzzies of doing your part to save the environment). Why print four pages that are partially covered in text when you can simplify them down to one easy to read, easy to carry, and easy to store sheet of paper?

If you’re familiar with older versions of Word, you’ve likely seen the Shrink one page command. Looking for the Shrink one page command in Word 2010? You might think a feature that many found handy in those previous versions of Microsoft Word would be giant, bold, and beautiful in an easy to access location. And if you’ve finally adjusted to the much resisted Ribbon, you’d probably be wise to look there for it. Unfortunately, it’s not on the Ribbon, so you have to manually add it.

Within Word, click the File tab.

Click Options and click Customize Ribbon.

In Choose commands from list, click All commands.

From the lengthy list of commands, click Shrink one page.

Under Customize the Ribbon, click the group to which you want to add the command.

Click Add.

Click OK.

Now the Shrink one page command is available on the Ribbon and you can use it to shrink your document. There you have it, in a nutshell: how to shrink a Word document.

How to Use Windows Live Photo Gallery to Share Your Pictures

One of the easiest ways to share your photos is through Windows Live Photo Gallery. Not only can you upload up to 500 photos in 30 days, but you can also edit them. In the following article, I’ll show you how to upload and share your photos using Windows Live Photo Gallery.

There are two ways that you can use Windows Live Photo Gallery. You can use the online version or you can download it to your computer as part of the Windows Live essentials. Here’s where you can download and install Windows Life Photo Gallery.

Note: for the purposes of this article, I’ll be using Windows Live Photo Gallery online.

Import your Photos

First, you need to import your photos. Assuming you are importing from a digital camera, plug your camera into your computer and turn the camera on. From the window that appears, click Import pictures and videos using Windows (this assumes you are running Windows 7). Windows automatically copies the photos to your computer and places them in the My Pictures folder. With the photos now imported, you’re ready to upload and share them.

Create your Photo Album and Upload Photos

Your next step is to create a photo album in Windows Live Photo Gallery. To start using Windows Live Photo Gallery, you need to sign into Windows Live. Type in your email address/password and click Sign in.

Note: If you don’t have a Windows Live ID, click the Sign Up button. You can sign up with any existing email address.

Once you’re signed-in, click Photos, and then click Create album. In the Name box, type the name of your album.

You can now set the permissions on the photo album. By default, everyone has access to your album. To specify other permissions, click Change. You can choose to share them just with the friends in your Windows Live network, select specific people, or keep them for yourself. If you change your mind later about whom to share an album with, you can easily edit these permissions on your album’s page. Click Next.

Now you can add photos to your album. To browse for a picture on your computer, click Select Photos from your computer. Alternatively, you can also drag a photo from your computer and drop it into the Drop photos here box.

Once you’re done adding photos to your album, click Continue and your album is ready to share.

Co-Author PowerPoint Presentations Part I

Co-Author PowerPoint Presentations Part IThis is the first part of a two-part post. The second part can be found here: Co-Author PowerPoint 2010 Presentations Part II.

Office 2010 makes it easier for you to co-author documents with multiple users. The new co-authoring functionality is available in PowerPoint 2010, Word 2010 and OneNote 2010 documents that are stored on a SharePoint Server 2010. In addition, you can use the co-authoring functionality in both Excel and OneNote Web Apps.

There are two caveats with the new co-authoring functionality. First, it requires SharePoint Foundation 2010 or a Windows Live SkyDrive account. Why? Because a server is required to maintain a central copy of the document and keep track of the edits made by multiple authors. Second, all co-authors must be running the latest version of Office. That is, to co-author a PowerPoint 2010 presentation, all co-authors must be running PowerPoint 2010.

By using the co-authoring functionality in PowerPoint 2010, you can see which author is editing the presentation, what part of the document they are editing. Furthermore, any changes made by your co-authors get merged into the presentation.

Now that you’ve got some background information about the new co-authoring functionality, let’s take a closer look at co-authoring in PowerPoint 2010.

To see how this all works, open a PowerPoint 2010 presentation that is stored on your SharePoint server. You can immediately tell if the presentation is currently being edited by other co-authors because a message appears in the status bar indicating the number of users currently working on the presentation.

If you switch to Normal View (On the View tab, within the Presentation Views group, click Normal), you can see who is editing a slide. Look in the left pane where the slide thumbnails appear. A small icon appears in the right hand corner of each slide currently being edited by another co-author. The icon indicates that a co-author is making changes.

There is more to the co-authoring functionality, as you’ll see in Part II.

Work at the Same Time in Word Part II

Work at the Same Time in Word Part IIWord 2010 includes many features that enable to you work more effectively with others on documents. Some of these features include: Block Authors, Save and Refresh, and Conflict Resolution Mode. In Part I, you learned about the Block Authors and Save and Refresh features. Now we’ll take a close look at the Conflict Resolution Mode.

If you’ve ever co-authored a document before, you’ve likely experienced some conflict; for example, when you and your co-author try to work on the document at the same time, one of you may get locked out while the other is editing. Conflict between co-authors can also occur when working offline; when you work on the document offline and the save it to the server. Furthermore, you can also run into co-authoring challenges when you and your co-author try to work on the same part of the document at the same time.

Conflict Resolution Mode in Word 2010 eliminates many of the challenges that occur when you co-author documents.

When there are editing conflicts, Word 2010 notifies you the next time you try to save the document. In fact, Word forces you to resolve the editing conflicts before it will let you save the document to the server. Any changes in the document are saved on your computer, even if there are editing conflicts, but the conflicts must be resolved before saving to the server.

When Word identifies conflicts due to co-authoring, a notification is displayed in the message bar and the status bar. You can click any of these notifications to switch to Conflict Resolution Mode and resolve the conflicts. When you switch to Conflict Resolution Mode, all conflicts are listed in a resolution pane and the Conflict tab appears on the Ribbon.

To resolve a conflict, click the conflict within the resolution pane. When you do, the conflicting portion of the document is highlighted. Any conflicting changes made by you are marked in pink.

To keep your change, click Accept on the Conflict tab. To remove your change, click Reject.

Work at the Same Time in Word Part I

Work at the Same Time in Word Part IWord 2010 includes many features that enable to you work more effectively with others on documents. Some of these features include: Block Authors, Save and Refresh, and Conflict Resolution Mode. In the following article, we’ll look at these features in more detail.

Note: many of the co-authoring features in Word 2010 are only available when your documents are stored on a SharePoint Server 2010.

Block Authors

When you co-author a document that is stored on a SharePoint Server Foundation 2010 site that supports workspaces, you can prevent your co-authors from making changes to specific sections within your document. For example, you can prevent co-authors from making changes to the table of contents.

Using the Block Authors feature is simple. Select the part of the document that you want to prevent others from changing. Click the Review tab. Within the Protect group, click Block Authors. With the section now blocked, you co-authors are not able to make changes to the section.

Save and Refresh

One of the great new features in Word 2010 is that you can work with others on the same document without interfering with one another’s work or locking each other out of a document. Again, if your document is stored on a SharePoint Server Foundation 2010, clicking the Save option does more than just update the document with your changes. Clicking the Save option does the following:

  • Saves any changes you have made to the file on the server
  • Updates the file you are viewing with any changes made by other authors
  • Stores the previous version

Furthermore, you have the ability to compare current versions of the document with previous versions. To compare versions click the File tab, click Info, and then click the stored version of the document. You can use the Compare feature on the Review tab to compare that version with the current version of the document.

Note: Many of the co-authoring features are available in other Microsoft Office 2010 applications, including, Microsoft PowerPoint 2010, Microsoft Word 2010, and Microsoft OneNote 2010 documents on SharePoint Server 2010. The new co-authoring functionality is also supported in Excel Web App and OneNote Web App.

Consolidate Data from Multiple Worksheets in Excel

In the following tip, you’ll learn how to consolidate data from multiple worksheets in Excel 2010.

One of the fabulous features of Excel 2010 is that you can consolidate data from separate worksheets to create a summary and report on results. Why would you want to consolidate data? It makes it much easier to analyze, update and summarize the data when it’s consolidated into one worksheet.

Let’s take a look at a specific example. Many people use excel worksheets to track expense figures. You might expense figures for each office in different worksheets. You can consolidate the data to roll the expense figures up into a single expense report that provides an overall summary.

The Consolidate Data feature in Excel 2010 lets you pull records from multiple worksheets into one master worksheet, which adds up all the data. There are two ways that you can consolidate data: consolidate by position and consolidate by category.

You would consolidate by position when the data from multiple worksheets is arranged in the same order and uses the same row and column labels. You would consolidate by category when the data from multiple worksheets is arranged differently, but the same row and column labels are used.

To consolidate data by position in Excel 2010, start by opening the worksheets that you want to consolidate. Open a new worksheet and give it a suitable name. Within the new worksheet, click the Data tab. Within the Data Tools group, click the Consolidate command.

Consolidate Data from Multiple Worksheets in Excel

The Consolidate window appears. Select the appropriate option from the Function drop down list. For example, if you want to show a sum of values for the consolidation, select the Sum option. Next, use the Browse or Add button to select the worksheets that you want to consolidate. Under ‘Use labels in’ select where the labels are located in the source ranges (select either Top row, Left column or both). Click OK.

Consolidate Data from Multiple Worksheets in Excel

The values are consolidated into one master worksheet.

Conflict Resolution Mode in Word

Conflict Resolution Mode in WordIn the following tip, you’ll learn about the new conflict resolution mode in Word 2010 and how to use it.

Microsoft Office 2010 includes new co-authoring features and functionality that make it easier for users to work together on the same document without. You can take advantage of the new co-authoring in Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 and Microsoft Word 2010 documents stored on a SharePoint Server 2010. You can also take advantage of the new co-authoring in the Web Apps — specifically Excel and OneNote.

If you’ve ever co-authored a document before, you’ve likely experienced some conflict; for example, when you and your co-author try to work on the document at the same time. Conflict between co-authors can also occur when working offline; when you work on the document offline and the save it to the server. Furthermore, you can also run into co-authoring challenges when you and your co-author try to work on the same part of the document at the same time.

When there are editing conflicts, Word notifies you the next time you try to save the document. In fact, Word forces you to resolve the editing conflicts before it will let you save the document to the server. Any changes in the document are saved on your computer, even if there are editing conflicts, but the conflicts must be resolved before saving to the server.

When Word identifies conflicts due to co-authoring, a notification is displayed in the message bar and the status bar. You can click any of these notifications to switch to Conflict Resolution Mode and resolve the conflicts. When you switch to Conflict Resolution Mode, all conflicts are listed in a resolution pane and the Conflict tab appears on the Ribbon.

To resolve a conflict, click the conflict within the resolution pane. When you do, the conflicting portion of the document is highlighted. Any conflicting changes made by you are marked in pink.

To keep your change, click Accept on the Conflict tab. To remove your change, click Reject.

Where is My Office 2010 Product Key?

Where is My Office 2010 Product Key?Are you trying to find your Office 2010 product key? It can be in one of several places, and how you obtained your copy of Microsoft Office 2010 determines where you will find your product key. For example, if you purchase a copy at a retail store, the product key is likely on the product packaging or on a product key card. However, this will not be not the case if you purchase a copy online.

Note: the product key is 25 characters long and looks like: XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX

So let us take a look at where you can find your Office 2010 product key.

Did you purchase a copy of Office at a retail store? If you purchase a full packaged copy of Office 2010 from a retail store that contains a retail disc, the product key is likely located on an orange sticker inside the installation disc. If the package does not include an installation disc, you can still find the product key on an orange sticker inside the package.

Did you purchase a copy of Office online? If you purchase a copy of Office online and the product is shipped to you, the product key is likely located on an orange sticker within the package. If you download a copy, the product key is included in the confirmation email you receive after you purchase and download Office.

Was Office already installed on your computer? Often times when you purchase a new computer, Office comes pre-installed. In such cases, you can find the product key on a certificate of authenticity or product key card bundled with the computer packaging.

Are you using a trial version? When you opt to download a trial version of Office, you receive a confirmation email. You can find the product key for the trial version within the confirmation email.

Add Artistic Effects in Word

Just because you’re using a computer doesn’t mean you can’t let your artistic side shine through — even if you’re making a document for business purposes. In the following tip, you’ll learn how to apply artistic effects to your pictures in Word 2010.

If there’s a budding graphic designer in you, you’ll love the new Artistic Effects feature in Word 2010. You can use it to apply a number of nifty artistic effects to pictures in your Word 2010 documents. The artistic effects make your pictures look more like sketches or paintings.

Let’s try it out to see how it works (and looks).

Insert a picture into your Word document. To do so, click the Insert tab followed by the Picture button within the Illustrations group. Locate a picture on your computer, select it and click Insert. With the image now inserted into your document, select it and you will see the Picture Tools tab appear.

Within the Adjust group, you will see the Artistic Effects button as shown in the figure below.

When you click the Artistic Effects button, a gallery of thumbnails appears showing the different effects you can apply. You can see a live preview of you image by hovering your mouse pointer over a thumbnail. This way you can see what an effect looks like before applying it. When you find an effect that you like, press Enter to apply it to your picture.

If you don’t want to use one of the thumbnails in the gallery, you can experiment with more advanced settings using the Artistic Effects Option. Instead of selecting one of the thumbnails from the Artistic Effects gallery, click Artistic Effect Options. The Format Picture window appears, as shown in the figure below.

From the Format Picture window, you can customize the various settings to create your own artistic effects. Click Close when you’re finished tweaking the settings to apply the changes.

Use the Crop Tool in Word

Have you ever had to deal with an image in your Word document that’s just a little too big or in need of having a certain part of it cut down to size? In the following tip, you’ll learn how to use the crop tool in Word 2010 to crop an image to a different shape.

When you insert an image into your Word document, you can use the crop tool to remove unwanted areas of the image. However, you can use the crop tool for much more than this. In Word 2010, you can also use the crop tool to crop an image to a different shape. Think of it as using a cookie cutter to cut your cookie dough into shapes. For example, you can crop an image into the shape of a circle or triangle.

So let’s take a closer look at how this works. First, insert an image into your document. When you select the inserted image, the Picture Tools tab appears.

From the Picture Tools Format tab, click the bottom half of the Crop button within the Size group.

Note: if you select the top of the Crop button, the standard rectangular cropping area is activated around the image so you can crop it.

When you click the bottom half of the crop button, a menu appears as shown in the figure below.

As you can see, there is a Crop to Shape option available on the menu. Hover your mouse pointer over the Crop to Shape option and a gallery of shapes appears as shown in the figure below. You can crop the image to any of these shapes.

Select one of the shapes, such as the triangle or the star and you can see a preview of the image cropped to this shape. Press Enter to crop the shape to the selected image.

Congratulations! In a few very simple steps, you’ve successfully applied a cookie cutter to your image.

Turn Off the Mini-Toolbar in Word

The mini-toolbar in Microsoft Word can be a helpful tool, but some people feel that it gets in the way of an otherwise good time. Do you number yourself in the former or latter category? Have you ever had the need to turn off the mini-toolbar in Microsoft Word?

In the following tip, you’ll learn how to turn the mini-toolbar on and off in Word 2010.

What is the mini-toolbar? The mini-toolbar appears any time you select text to make it easier for you to perform basic formatting tasks, such as bolding or italicizing text. The commands available on the mini-toolbar include:

  • Font — change the font face
  • Font size — increase/decrease the size of text
  • Grow / Shrink Font — increase/decrease the size of text
  • Indent — increase/decrease the indent level of the paragraph
  • Bold / Italicize / Underline
  • Center — center the text
  • Text Color Highlight — make text look like it was highlighted with a highlighter pen
  • Font Color — change the color of the text
  • Format Painter — copy formatting from one place and apply it to another

The mini-toolbar in Word 2010 is shown in the figure below.

Turn Off the Mini-Toolbar in Word

As soon as you select text within your document, the small, faded out toolbar appears above the top of the text. If you move your mouse over the toolbar, it becomes clearer (no longer faded) and you can click on any of the toolbar commands to format the text.

Although the mini-toolbar is useful to some, others prefer to use the standard toolbar and find the min-toolbar to be a nuisance. If you never use the mini-toolbar, you can easily turn it off so it no longer appears when you select text. In Word 2010, click the File Tab, Options, and the General. Under the list of User Interface Options, uncheck the Show Mini Toolbar option.

Turn Off the Mini-Toolbar in Word

Now when you select text, the mini-toolbar does not appear.

Create a Curved Arrow in Word

Have you ever wondered how to go about drawing a curved arrow in Microsoft Word? In the following tip, you’ll learn how to draw a curved arrow in Word 2010.

If you’ve ever wanted (or needed) to add a curved arrow to your Word document, you may have thought that it’s as simple as using the Insert button within the Illustrations group. However, this is not the case; there is no curved arrow available on the Insert menu — only straight, blocked, or wavy arrows.

To add a curved arrow to your document, you have to do so manually. You start by adding a curved line and then change one of the end points to an arrow.

To add a curved line, click the Insert tab. Within the Illustrations group, click the Shapes button.

Create a Curved Arrow in Word

From the available lines, choose one of the curved lines. For the purpose of this exercise, choose the arced line under the Basic Shapes, as shown in the figure below.

Create a Curved Arrow in Word

Insert the curved line into your document. Your line should look similar to the one shown below.

Create a Curved Arrow in Word

As you can see, the line currently has no arrow. Now you need to customize the line’s end point to change it to an arrow. Click the line within your document and the Drawing Tools tab appears. Click the Format tab. Within the Shape Styles group, click Shape Outline, point to Arrows and select an arrow style.

Create a Curved Arrow in Word

If you still want to make the line more curved, select the line once again. Under the Drawing Tools tab, within the Shape Styles group, click Edit Shape. Click one of the end points of the line to activate it. A direction handle appears in the middle of the line. Drag the direction handle to alter the curve.

And that’s all there is to it! You successfully created a curved arrow in a few simple steps.

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?

There are many ways that plain old text can be jazzed up to give the reader something a little more than the same old format every time. In Microsoft word, formatting marks show you the different formatting that has been applied throughout your Word document. For example, formatting marks show you where section or page pages have been inserted. In the following tip, you’ll learn what the various formatting marks mean as well as how to control formatting marks.

By default, formatting marks are not visible within a document; however, you can easily turn them on. When you do, Word displays different characters which represent specific formatting marks. For example, the symbol What Do Formatting Marks Mean?represents paragraph marks. The various formatting marks are shown below.

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?Paragraph mark

Column Break

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?Page Break

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?Continuous Section Break

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?Line and Page Break

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?Line Break

. Space

° Nonbreaking Space

? Tab

¬ Conditional Hyphen

¤ End Of Cell Marker (tables)

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?Anchor

To show formatting characters, click the ‘Show/Hide paragraph marks and other hidden formatting symbols’ button.

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?

In Word 2010, you can also control formatting marks via Word Options. Click the File tab, Options, and then click Display. From the window, you can control what formatting marks are shown throughout your document.

What Do Formatting Marks Mean?

If you select any of the formatting boxes, such as Tab characters, Hidden text and Spaces, they are visible in your document at all times, regardless of whether the Show formatting marks button is off.

If you select the Show all formatting marks option at the bottom of the list, all of the formatting marks are visible within in your document. Selecting this option is the same thing as selecting the Show Formatting Marks button on the ribbon. So, as you can probably see, selecting this option is very much redundant to selecting the Show formatting marks button on the ribbon. If you want to show formatting marks, it’s much easier to use the button.

How to Retain What You Learn and Protect Your Training Investment

How to Retain What You Learn and Protect Your Training InvestmentYou attend a training session and two weeks later you’ve forgotten most of what you learned. What does this mean? Money spent on the training is pretty much wasted.

Training is an investment, in some cases an expensive one. How can you ensure that you get a good return on that investment? The answer is knowledge retention! With a little bit of focused effort, you can increase your knowledge retention level to 90%. For example, applying your new knowledge within a few hours of training dramatically increases retention.

What can you do to increase your knowledge retention? Here are a few tips for you to consider:

Take notes throughout the training. Note taking increases retention — even if you don’t refer to them again. The simple process of writing or typing reinforces what you learn.

Pay close attention to any videos or visuals. Many people retain more through audio-visual elements as opposed to just reading.

Take a few moments to reflect on what you learned, why it’s important and how it applies to you. This is really about finding deeper meaning in what you learn.

If possible, apply your learning as soon as possible. Doing so, takes the learning from conceptual to practical and puts the learning into context for you. As I mentioned earlier, the sooner you can apply your learning, the higher your knowledge retention.

Engage in discussion. Talking with others about what you’ve learned increases your level of understanding and reinforces your learning.

Coach/train others. One of the best ways to retain knowledge is to explain something to others through coaching or training. In fact, in doing so, you not only retain knowledge but often become an expert.

To put this in perspective and demonstrate the retention levels associated with some of the activities recommended above, learners typically retain:

90% of what they learn when they teach someone else/use immediately.

75% of what they learn when they practice what they learned.

50% of what they learn when engaged in a group discussion.

30% of what they learn when they see a demonstration.

20% of what they learn from audio-visual.

10% of what they learn when they’ve learned from reading.

5% of what they learn when they’ve learned from lecture.

Embed .WAV Audio Files in PowerPoint

Embed .WAV Audio Files In PowerPointWhy in the heck would you want to jazz up your boring old PowerPoint presentation with a .WAV audio file? Isn’t it just going to be shown to a bunch of mid-morning, caffeine-deprived zombies (as most of us are) in a meeting designed to prod them into being more attentive to some counterproductive, company mandated policy or another? As soon as the lights are out and the gentle susurrus of the projector hums its soothing lullaby, half of your audience will already drooling on freshly pressed neckties and dreaming of long-over (or overdue) Caribbean vacations. Why would you disturb such tranquil slumber with imposing .WAV audio files in a PowerPoint presentation? Well, probably because you want to jar your congregation into a semblance of alacrity. After all, if you had to go through the trouble of making this damned thing, the least you should expect is that others will have to suffer through it. Misery, after all, loves the heck out of company; the more company there is, the merrier it shall be.

One of the challenges of using audio with a PowerPoint presentation is that the audio files and the .PPT file must be in the same folder. However, if your audio files are .WAV files, you can embed them into the PowerPoint presentation. The only disadvantage is that the embedded files increase the overall size of the PowerPoint presentation.

To embed a .WAV audio file into a PowerPoint presentation:

Within your PowerPoint file, click the Insert tab. Click Sounds and select Sound from file. Select the audio file you want to embed and click OK.

If the .WAV file is linked rather than embedded, you may need to increase the file size limit. Select the sound object and click Sounds from the ribbon. In the Sound Options, increase the value of the Max Sound File Size so it is larger than the .WAV file you are trying to embed.