How To Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, And Vanish Without A Trace

There should be an image here!How To Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, And Vanish Without A Trace is the authoritative and comprehensive guide for people who seek to protect their privacy as well as for anyone who’s ever entertained the fantasy of disappearing — whether actually dropping out of sight or by eliminating the traceable evidence of their existence.

Written by the world’s leading experts on finding people and helping people avoid being found, How to Disappear covers everything from tools for disappearing to discovering and eliminating the nearly invisible tracks and clues we tend to leave wherever we go. Learn the three keys to disappearing, all about your electronic footprints, the dangers and opportunities of social networking sites, and how to disappear from a stalker.

Frank Ahearn and Eileen Horan provide field-tested methods for maintaining privacy, as well as tactics and strategies for protecting personal information and preventing identity theft. They explain and illustrate key tactics such as misinformation (destroying all the data known about you); disinformation (creating fake trails); and, finally, reformation — the act of getting you from point A to point B without leaving clues.

Ahearn illustrates every step with real-life stories of his fascinating career, from undercover work to nab thieving department store employees to a stint as a private investigator; and, later, as a career “skip tracer” who finds people who don’t want to be found. In 1997, when news broke of President Bill Clinton’s dalliance with a White House intern, Ahearn was hired to find her. When Oscar statuettes were stolen in Beverly Hills, Ahearn pinpointed a principal in the caper to help solve the case. When Russell Crowe threw a telephone at a hotel clerk in 2005, Ahearn located the victim and hid him from the media.

An indispensable resource not just for those determined to become utterly anonymous, but also for just about anyone in the brave new world of online information, How to Disappear sums up Ahearn’s dual philosophy: Don’t break the law, but know how to protect yourself.

How to Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, and Vanish without a Trace

  • Author(s): Frank M. Ahearn, Eileen C. Horan
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; First edition (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English

How To Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, And Vanish Without A Trace

There should be an image here!How To Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, And Vanish Without A Trace is the authoritative and comprehensive guide for people who seek to protect their privacy as well as for anyone who’s ever entertained the fantasy of disappearing — whether actually dropping out of sight or by eliminating the traceable evidence of their existence.

Written by the world’s leading experts on finding people and helping people avoid being found, How to Disappear covers everything from tools for disappearing to discovering and eliminating the nearly invisible tracks and clues we tend to leave wherever we go. Learn the three keys to disappearing, all about your electronic footprints, the dangers and opportunities of social networking sites, and how to disappear from a stalker.

Frank Ahearn and Eileen Horan provide field-tested methods for maintaining privacy, as well as tactics and strategies for protecting personal information and preventing identity theft. They explain and illustrate key tactics such as misinformation (destroying all the data known about you); disinformation (creating fake trails); and, finally, reformation — the act of getting you from point A to point B without leaving clues.

Ahearn illustrates every step with real-life stories of his fascinating career, from undercover work to nab thieving department store employees to a stint as a private investigator; and, later, as a career “skip tracer” who finds people who don’t want to be found. In 1997, when news broke of President Bill Clinton’s dalliance with a White House intern, Ahearn was hired to find her. When Oscar statuettes were stolen in Beverly Hills, Ahearn pinpointed a principal in the caper to help solve the case. When Russell Crowe threw a telephone at a hotel clerk in 2005, Ahearn located the victim and hid him from the media.

An indispensable resource not just for those determined to become utterly anonymous, but also for just about anyone in the brave new world of online information, How to Disappear sums up Ahearn’s dual philosophy: Don’t break the law, but know how to protect yourself.

How to Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, and Vanish without a Trace

  • Author(s): Frank M. Ahearn, Eileen C. Horan
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; First edition (September 1, 2010)
  • Language: English

Will Anonymous BitTorrent Users Be Able To Hide?

New services are being designed in an attempt to hide the identity of BitTorrent users and others who share files. In an age when copyrighted materials are being shared openly, and when governmental and other associations are monitoring the sites, file sharing services are looking at a way to hide the IP addresses of those who share. But will anonymous users be able to hide and not get caught?

According to an article at TorrentFreak it states:

The UK government has high hopes for the piracy warnings Internet providers will be required to send to copyright infringing customers. The warnings are designed to scare users away from illicit file-sharing, but when we asked our readers what action they would take upon receiving a warning letter from their ISP, many were unmovable. A massive 41% indicated that they would take steps to conceal their identity, while only 7% of our readers said they would obey the warning and stop sharing.

The results of the survey clearly showed that avid file-sharers would rather hide their identities than stop downloading. And indeed, more and more BitTorrent users are seeking ways to protect their privacy online, rendering all the newly proposed anti-piracy laws useless.

TorrentPrivacy, BitBlinder and The Pirate Bay’s Ipredator are just a few examples of services launched in the past year, targeted at concerned BitTorrent users. The goal of these and other anonymity applications is clear; hide the IP-address of the file-sharer so he can’t be tracked down while swapping files.

Currently in beta, The Pirate Bay’s Ipredator uses the same tech platform as the VPN service Relakks. For a few dollars a month it routes all your traffic through its servers, hiding your IP address. Ipredator is currently limited to 3000 users but according to the Pirate Bay team there are another 180,000 users on the waiting list, eager to join.

Running a VPN network for hundreds of thousands of hungry BitTorrent users will prove to be quite a challenge. The infrastructure and bandwidth required by a service targeted at file-sharers is significant, not to mention costly. This undoubtedly leads to problems.

The aforementioned Relakks saw its subscriptions double in just a month when the controversial Ipred law came into effect in Sweden this April. This surge in subscriptions led to to major problems with support and updates according to Relakks’s chairman Jan Erik Fiske.

So it seems that the cat and mouse game will continue. Which makes me wonder. Will this type of anonymous file sharing programs really work? Or will the government and other associations be able to crack them?

What do you think?

Comments welcome.

Source.

NotchUp

The job recruiting process is broken in so many ways. If I listed all of them here, then there would be no space for the actual review. Companies waste a lot of time and money recruiting people, and as a potential job candidate, you have to deal with seemingly endless interviews with companies that may or may not actually be very interested in you. In turn, you end up wasting a lot of your own time. Companies are always looking for the best, and if you’re great at what you do, then you could receive offers from these companies to get paid just to take part in an interview. NotchUp makes this possible.

I received an invitation to this service through a member, and I was impressed with how easy it was to get started. Instead of having to manually enter in all of your professional information, you can have the service connect to your LinkedIn account and bring all of those nicely formatted details to your NotchUp profile. It’s up to you to specify what your interview price is, but if you’re not sure of a figure to use, check out the interview calculator that can give you a good idea about what to charge. You can easily ask for hundreds of dollars, but actually receiving offers like that is an entirely different story. Whether you’re currently looking for another job or not, NotchUp will protect your privacy and keep you anonymous until you accept interview offers, which is great.

Why You Don't Want To Be Anonymous On The Internet

Back in 1939 when the classic movie Casablanca was released, and before the Internet was even a daily word, the world was already getting to be a smaller place. One of the lines spoked by Humphrey Bogart was something like ‘of all the gin joints, in all the world, she has to come to mine.’ Today with the advent of the Internet this little mud ball we call planet Earth continues to shrink in size. So when I see posting comments here or other areas of the Internet using ‘anonymous’ I always wonder why? What is the purpose of doing that?

I am not saying to post your full name, home address, phone number or other personal information on the Internet for all to see, but to seek a moniker or nickname that identifies you. In the forums or other areas where I post comments, I always try and use one name as my sign in name and to identify myself to others. I also note that others do the same whether they use their real name or nickname, they are readily identifiable no matter where they go on the Internet. Last week I posted A story of one mans adventure using Linux that had been written on one of the forums by V.T. Eric Layton. Eric latter stopped by and posted a comment. How did he find my article among millions of others? Think about that for a minute as I explain further.

This next part is mainly directed at those of you who are trying to be Beta testers, or seeking recognition, or trying to share your expertise and become noted on the Internet. You would be amazed at how many people and companies watch the Internet for comments about their products and services. In my posting of several articles about Dell computers, Dell representative actually stopped by to post their comments. Or as in the case of V.T. Eric Layton, he was able to locate my article.

My point is this. If you wish to establish a presence on the Internet sit down and develop a name that you use when either posting comments in forums, posting comments in blogs or where ever you choose to post anything on the Internet. I recognize other people on the Internet by either their names, nicknames or monikers. If I note this information you can be assured that others do as well.

So instead of hiding behind the word ‘anonymous’ get yourself known. Try this. Do a Google search for your name. If nothing comes up than you are already anonymous and it might be time for a change. :-)
[tags]anonymous, name, internet, secrecy, recognition, [/tags]

Long Time Lost

Searching for yourself on Google is something that most of us have done in the past, and many of you likely perform this vanity search every few weeks or even so frequently as every day. Doing this is a risk because you can either build up your ego or completely destroy it depending on what you see. Either way, it’s nice to know what’s being said about you, and you’ll probably find stuff that you never even expected. Just think for a moment about what you would do if you searched for your name and found a search result from someone that was looking to get in touch and reconnect with you. Depending on how you feel about this, it could either be really cool or completely frightening. If you’re leaning towards the first option, then Long Time Lost may interest you.

Basically, anyone who wants to find someone can create a search on Long Time Lost for the person that they’re looking for, the search engines will then index this information, and then the only thing that is left to do is play the waiting game. The idea is that eventually either the person or someone that knows them will see this information while searching and be able to provide some information. Those who reply to these requests can choose to remain fairly anonymous to start with, but if they want to, they can choose to include their e-mail address, mailing address, phone number, or even a picture. I can definitely see this service being used for good, and it’s already reconnected over 100 people, but at the same time, you know as well as I do that some mischievous person/people will take advantage of the system and respond as if they’re someone that they’re not. Hopefully people are better than that.

[tags]Long Time Lost, Google, Search, Vanity Search, Ego, Reconnect, Anonymous[/tags]