FBI Busts Thugs in Fake Anti-Virus Scareware Scam

FBI Busts Thugs in Fake Anti-Virus Scareware Scam We are all aware of the recent computer hacking directed towards some of the most sensitive information in our country. The criminals who perpetrated these crimes tried to disguise their actions by doing it anonymously. In this same venue, many of you are aware of scareware, which is generally introduced as a fake message that falsely informs you that your system has an infection. Once your system is infected with scareware, it will cost you between $49.95 and $129 to remove the bug from your system.

This type of hacking has been going on for years and I have been required to remove it from the computers that had been infected, but I wondered at the time why it was so difficult for the authorities to arrest these individuals. Thankfully, the FBI completed a sting operation that has shut down a network of hackers that proved to be worldwide. We also need to offer thanks to European authorities who, working in conjunction with the US, shut down operations in Latvia, France, Sweden, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. The FBI estimates that over 960,000 computers were infected with this fake virus.

The effect of the scareware was to freeze up infected computers while a pop-up would appear that resembled a Windows warning screen. However, in this case, the alert was false and tricked consumers into purchasing a purported fix that consisted of a fake anti-virus software. If a consumer didn’t buy the fake software, the files on the system became inaccessible, adding to their frustration.

So how can you avoid becoming s scareware victim? As a user you should never purchase or install any software that hasn’t been recommended to you by a professional or that you are not familiar with. Additionally, beware of those ‘free scans’ that you may see when surfing the Internet as they could well be bait to access your computer and as always you need to protect your system with a legitimate and up-to-date anti-virus program. Some of the free reputable companies include avast!, AVG, and Avira AntiVir Personal, which are available for consumers who cannot afford to purchase another commercial product.

Is It A Real Virus Or A False-Positive?

The recent headlines by a security guru claiming that Samsung computers came with a built-in key-logger, turned out to be a false-positive by the security software he was using. So what is a false-positive and how can you avoid becoming a victim?

A false-positive usually occurs when a known good file on a computer system is tagged by a security software as being a bug. The user normally will be alerted by their security software that the system is infected and usually will identify which files[s] are contain the virus. In reality the system is not infected and the security software is sending a false report. The opposite of a false-positive is a false-negative in which the security software actually misses a virus and reports that the system is clean. Neither of the situations are desirable and can cause consumers considerable anguish.

One would think that buying the most expensive security software would be the best solution. The unfortunate thing is that no commercial nor free security software is totally immune from either a false-positive nor a false-negative. Almost every software program designed to intercept any type of critter on a computer system has had both false-positives and false-negative incidence sometime during their existence. So what are we consumers supposed to do to prevent either situation from occurring?

Your first thought is why don’t I just run two or more security softwares on my system. This way one of the programs is sure to find the bug. Though this type of thinking appears sound, the problem is that running more than one software at a time to root out bugs can cause problems. Anti-virus and security suites are designed to run in the background during idle times to keep track of unwanted changes on the computer. Two similar type softwares running at the same time can interfere with the performance of both software products and can actually can, in some cases, slow your system to a crawl.

What I do is fairly simple. I have been using free anti-virus programs for six years and have never had a problem. I used AVG for many years without an issue nor an infection, but about six months ago when the company introduced AVG 2011, the program caused issues on my personal computer system. I made a change over to the free edition of Avast which has worked flawlessly for me. It works quietly in the back ground and doesn’t appear to have caused any undesirable performance issues to my computer system. However, I do not rely on just one software program to make sure my system remains infection free.

Every few weeks or so I run Malwarebytes and scan my system for infections. About once a month or so I run an online scanner such as Kaspersky, Bit-defender, Trend Micro or other online scanner. This formula has worked well for me over the years and none of my personal nor work computers have ever been infected nor have I received a false-positive report.

If you do receive a virus alert and if your are unsure it is legitimate or not, copy and past the alert into your browser and do a search. You may find that your are not the only victim of having received a false report of a bug.

Comments welcome.

 

What Is The Best Anti-Virus Software?

This is a common question among anyone who owns a computer. When it comes to computer security software you have to think of multiple questions when trying to choose the right brand. Ultimately it is the user’s choice of how much protection they think that they want on their system.

Right off the bat there is one choice that a user must make: paid or free? There are advantages to both and it is dependent on the user to figure out if they want to spend money to protect their computer… or not. With a paid version of anti-virus you have the security of knowing the company is looking out for your best interests and because you are paying them they have an obligation to send out frequent up-to-date virus signatures to help protect your computer. Also, with paid memberships, some companies have some sort of guarantee that their computer will be covered up to a certain amount of money if a virus does destroy their computer.

Free versions of anti-virus software do not have a protection guarantee and usually are run by someone out of the kindness of their own hearts. That means there might not be as frequent updates as the paid versions and because you are not paying a company there might be some virus signatures that may be missed or incorrectly marked. Now don’t get me wrong, some free anti-virus software is comparable with the paid brands, but might not have as many features as a paid version.

My favorite paid anti-virus is ESET Nod32, I’ve used it for the last three years and have not looked back. Its security center has multiple features to keep a user safe, including a built-in firewall, active file monitoring, and early detection. My personal lifesaver is the active file monitoring — every new file created on my computer is scanned for viruses and will alert me if something is wrong. I also chose ESET Nod32 because of its track record. Its detection record is unmatched; it has never missed an in-the-wild virus for as long as the product has been around. Over all of the other paid brands, I have to give it up for ESET.

For the users who may not want to pay for an anti-virus, I strongly suggest that they use Microsoft Security Essentials. It is the most lightweight and powerful free anti-virus system that I have come across. Microsoft took its amazing product, what used to be called OneCare, and made it free. If you look at the logic behind the system it is made by Microsoft and this massive organization is paying its good people to protect your system. To me you’re almost getting the benefits of a paid system. You can also trust Microsoft to not put any spyware, adware, or any type of ware in your product. Again, for the free route, check out Microsoft Security Essentials.

For all you Mac and Linux users out there, don’t think you’re safe. Every computer is susceptible to a virus attack of any kind, although just not as likely, you can still be attacked. For the Mac users out there, try out ESET’s Mac edition, for the same reasons as before: its track record is unmatched. For you Linux users I do recommend ClamAV — that is the only Linux anti-virus that I’ve played around with and found to be a great protection on my Linux box.

There are all different brands out there from which you can pick, both paid and free. To keep you and your computer safe, keep your anti-virus system up to date and know what Web sites you are surfing. You are the front line of protection.

It is Free!

Craigslist is a wonderful thing. I have bought and sold several items on it. Occasionally a listing can generate a surprise. Sometimes potential buyers want to negotiate or swap. Just yesterday I declined an offer to sell a computer that I had listed for the equivalent in tattoos from a licensed legitimate practitioner. Since I made it through 70 years without tattoos, it seems reasonable to try to go the whole way.

But today Craigslist surprised me again. A letter self-identified as coming from Ryan Barnes, CEO of Craigslist, gave me the good news that in conjunction with a special promotion from Apple, Craigslist was giving out a limited number of free iPhones (valued at $800), and (applause please) I had been selected to get one! All I had to do was to click on the website to claim it.

Of course I had to click immediately because this offer was only good for one day. That is a nice touch.

Instead of clicking, I went to the Craigslist site and navigated to where I could report a spoof. Since I sent this out a few minutes ago, there is nothing to report about their response. Who knows, maybe it is legitimate. Maybe instead of waiting I should…

Strangely enough, this letter came shortly after I received a phone call from an anxious friend who teaches several courses in PC usage. His computer had been infected! Infections are not unusual, but he is definitely not a novice user. Based on the description of what happened to him, I suggested how to proceed to clean it. At least he had done the correct thing by immediately shutting down his modem and then isolating the infected machine from others in his house. Also, since this just happened, I cannot report if my advice worked or if any permanent harm has occurred.

The lesson of these two events is that anti-virus software is not enough. Relying on McAfee, Norton, AVG, or your application of choice is insufficient. Relying on anti-virus software to protect your computer is roughly like relying on seat belts to prevent accidents. In both cases, the primary responsibility is on the operator. I know people who have decided that anti-virus software is not worth the overhead and “go naked” without any protection other than careful surfing.

That probably works for some people, but I tend to be paranoid and keep up to date with anti-virus software. Also I check for safe surfing sites. Those habits do not guarantee that I will not become infected, but it does lower the probability, and that is about all one can ask.

I wonder how many free iPhones Craigslist has given out?

Laptop Dilemma

Much to my surprise, some good occasional clients recently decided to switch from PC to Mac after their business desktop crashed and would not boot beyond the Blue Screen anymore. They had two laptops and the faulty desktop. After saving all personal data on the laptops to a flash drive, they took the desktop to the Apple store to have data transferred. Apparently they were able to read the hard drive and recover everything.

Since they did not want to have a mixture of Macs and PCs, they brought their laptops to me to scrub the personal data on them while preserving the applications. They intended to give the laptops to younger relatives who are not computer-enabled.

I would probably do this simple service for free or a nominal charge since they have been clients for years (at least with the business computer and occasional tutoring). However, both laptops were behind on Windows updates and both had only 512 meg of RAM. My how times have changed! It seems like yesterday when that would have been a top of the line feature. While I was looking at one of them, a warning popped up that the anti-virus software was expired.

So now I have a marketing dilemma. Would the clients go along with a purchase of more RAM and updating the anti-virus software, or since they are planning to give both laptops to other people who I do not know, should we let it slide? That is, I did not want to come off like I was trying to pad the bill by adding tasks, but truly thought the laptops needed the additional work.

So I did what always seems to work best. I called them and we discussed the issues. We came to a pleasant compromise. I had a spare 512 meg stick that could go into the older of the laptops, but no memory of the higher speed newer laptop. The client would purchase some suitable additional memory and deliver it to me. I would download and install any updates needed for all applications. We decided to punt on the anti-virus software.

So this works out. I get some compensation and happy clients. They feel good about being able to help relatives for a rather small additional expense, and supposedly the recipients will be ecstatic.

The story would have ended there, but I got a call asking if I could recover some additional data from the failed desktop. The transfer was not complete. They had not discovered it until they started using the new computer.

‘Here You Have’ Virus Spreading Like Wildfire

McAfee labs is reporting what is being called the ‘here you have’ or ‘just for you’ virus that  tricks users into believing that there is a .pdf file or sex movie waiting for them. Once the payload is activated, the virus may try to send itself to everyone in your address book. The message being sent to individuals appears like so:

Subject: Here you have or Just For you
Body:

Hello:

This is The Document I told you about,you can find it Here.
http://www.sharedocuments.com/library/PDF_Document21.025542010.pdf

Please check it and reply as soon as possible.

Cheers,

or

Hello:

This is The Free Dowload Sex Movies,you can find it Here.
http://www.sharemovies.com/library/SEX21.025542010.wmv

Enjoy Your Time.

Cheers,

Your best defense is not to open any attachments of links from persons you do not know. Next, you will want to keep your anti-virus program updated with the latest virus definitions.

Notice the misspelling of the word Download.

Be safe.

Comments welcome.

Source – McAfee

Bank Trojan Zeus Takes Direct Aim At Firefox Users

One of the most dangerous trojans around, named Zeus, steals users’ banking account information — and now it’s taking aim at Firefox users for the first time. One security company, called Trusteer, states that the trojan has cracked Firefox security. Here is the scary part:

Trusteer describes this as a ‘unprecedented rate of distribution’, which is probably not an unfair characterisation given the malware’s known tendency to deliberately under-infect available victims as a way of staying out of the detection range of honeypots. Variants of Zeus also have a history of evading many antivirus scanners when they first appear.”We expect this new version of Zeus to significantly increase fraud losses, since nearly 30 percent of internet users bank online with Firefox and the infection rate for this piece of malware is growing faster than we have ever seen before,” said Trusteer’s CTO, Amit Klein.

Mozilla Firefox Icon
Image via Wikipedia

Now one does have to ask. When will Mozilla be patching its browser? How effective will any patching be against such a virulent trojan?

Comments welcome.

Source

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Google Reports That Fake Anti-Virus Products Are On The Rise

In a recent report, Google cites that the incidence of fake anti-virus products [Fake AV] are on the rise. In its report, Google states that such attacks do not require any user intervention and that the malicious code is installed automatically without the user even being aware of it. I have personally seen this types of attacks on some of my clients’ computer systems, and these can usually be removed by a good A/V cleaner or scrubber.

The report from Google also states:

Visiting a malicious or compromised Web site — or sometimes even viewing a malicious ad — can produce a screen looking something like the following:

CLICK TO ENLARGE

I have found both Malwarebytes and Spyware Doctor with anti-virus to be effective.

Malwarebytes can be found here

Spyware Doctor can be found on the Google Pack site

Source

Why Anti-Virus Won’t Stop Fake Security Infections

Q: I have McAfee AntiVirus installed but still got infected by a fake security program that completely took over my computer. Should I be using something else for protection? — Gina

A: In the world of computers, there is currently a ‘scareware pandemic’ in play that is fooling millions of users every day.

Scareware refers to rogue programs that scare folks into doing something that, in this case, actually infects their computer.

Typically, users are initially exposed to these programs when visiting a Web site that is laced with the instructions to pop-up a fake warning that your computer is infected. These warnings look very similar to Windows screens and cause most folks to follow the prompts to ‘scan’ or ‘fix’ the problem.

Eventually, the ‘fix’ asks the user for a credit card number, which is when most folks realize something ‘phishy’ is going on, but by that time it’s too late. The second that anyone clicks on the button to ‘scan’ or ‘fix,’ it instructs your computer to install the evil code in the background while making you believe that it’s scanning your computer for viruses.

It’s by far, the most common reason that we are seeing ‘patients’ in our stores throughout the country.

This class of malicious software began appearing on the Internet in 2006 and has grown at a veracious rate simply because it is an effective way of getting into your computer. As of this writing, there are over 300 variants of fake security programs with new versions appearing on a weekly basis.

There is even a fake security program that calls itself ‘Data Doctor 2010’ which as you can imagine causes some confusion for our customers (we are not the authors, they simply made use of our name hoping to fool users).

Once they infect you, they can steal your credit card information, infect the machine for use as a silent soldier in a ‘botnet’ army, or install anything else that they so desire.

The reason your McAfee AntiVirus didn’t protect you is that it couldn’t and neither would any other company’s anti-virus because you clicked on a button that told Windows and your security program that you wanted to install a program.

These malicious programs are very well written and look like any other program, like a screensaver or photo management program to your operating system and security programs.

Keep in mind, while these evil programmers are cooking up these concoctions, they have the ability to test it on every major anti-virus program on the market before they launch it. In other words, they can keep working with the code until they know that your anti-virus program will think it is a legitimate program.

Once they accomplish that, their only task is to fool you into clicking on a button to start the process of infiltrating your computer.

This, unfortunately, is why so many people are getting infected and your anti-virus program is powerless to protect you from yourself.

Most folks that get infected immediately start searching Google for a way to get rid of these programs, which exposes them to yet more scams of programs that claim they can help if you pay.

The best information for removal will be the manual registry steps to eradicate the scareware code from the core of the Windows operating system, but even those instructions can be dated in a few short months.

The authors of the malware also scan the Internet to see how folks are removing their code, then they update their code to block or evade those removal instructions, so if you are searching for help on any specific infection, make sure to refine your search to only show you results from the past week (click on the ‘Show options’ link above the search results in Google).

In the future, pay very close attention to warning screens. In your case, you have McAfee installed, so if the warning is not clearly coming from the McAfee program, cancel the warning.

Ken Colburn
Data Doctors Computer Services
Data Doctors Data Recovery Labs
Data Doctors Franchise Systems, Inc.
Weekly video tech contributor to CNN.com
Host of the award-winning “Computer Corner” radio show

The Lack Of Scruples Is Just Criminal

There should be an image here!It is really despicable. There is no low to which hackers and criminals won’t stoop to deliver malware to you. As many of you know, recently there was a tragedy at the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Nodar Kumaritashvili, a luger from the former Soviet republic of Georgia, died in a crash in a training run. Criminals have used that incident to deliver malware through bogus tribute sites, news sites, videos, and so forth.

These people have no scruples.

During the Olympics, you may want to keep up with your favorite Olympic sport. That works to the hackers’ advantage. You may want to follow a news item of some recent political story. That works to the hackers’ advantage. Whatever generates traffic, these criminals will take advantage of the opportunity.

We want our readers to protect themselves. This malware junk is intended to ambush people online. It does not matter where you go now online. Simply being online is a danger and security precautions should be taken. And every machine that you use should be protected.

Every machine that you use to go online, no matter how briefly, has to be protected. Even if you have a machine that you do not put online, it should be protected. You may sync your other computers to this machine that you keep offline and some malware may slip onto your system. Because we strongly recommend protecting all your machines, we recommend the award winning security offered by Spyware Doctor:

Spyware Doctor with AntiVirus is a top-rated malware, spyware & virus removal utility that detects, removes and protects your PC from thousands of potential spyware, adware, trojans, viruses, keyloggers, spybots and tracking threats.” It has won numerous awards and Spyware Doctor is good for “Microsoft Windows 7 (32bit, 64bit), Windows Vista SP1+ (32bit, 64bit), Windows XP SP2+ (32bit).”

This is one of the premier, well recognized security programs, and PC Tools is allowing three computers to be protected under one license. That means that, for under seventeen dollars each, three computers can be protected from viruses, spyware, malware, and other security threats.

Spyware Doctor can be purchased with a Gnomie discount here.

Remember: When you use Spyware Doctor, update the security definitions regularly. It is doubtful that malware will decrease any time soon, and security measures are absolutely necessary — unfortunately.

Delivering Malware To You By Any Means

There should be an image here!It is really despicable. There is no low to which hackers and criminals won’t stoop to deliver malware to you. As many of you know, recently there was a tragedy at the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Nodar Kumaritashvili, a luger from the former Soviet republic of Georgia, died in a crash in a training run. Criminals have used that incident to deliver malware through bogus tribute sites, news sites, videos, and so forth.

These people have no scruples.

During the Olympics, you may want to keep up with your favorite Olympic sport. That works to the hackers’ advantage. You may want to follow a news item of some recent political story. That works to the hackers’ advantage. Whatever generates traffic, these criminals will take advantage of the opportunity.

We want our readers to protect themselves. This malware junk is intended to ambush people online. It does not matter where you go now online. Simply being online is a danger and security precautions should be taken. And every machine that you use should be protected.

Every machine that you use to go online, no matter how briefly, has to be protected. Even if you have a machine that you do not put online, it should be protected. You may sync your other computers to this machine that you keep offline and some malware may slip onto your system. Because we strongly recommend protecting all your machines, we recommend the award winning security offered by Spyware Doctor:

Spyware Doctor with AntiVirus is a top-rated malware, spyware & virus removal utility that detects, removes and protects your PC from thousands of potential spyware, adware, trojans, viruses, keyloggers, spybots and tracking threats.” It has won numerous awards and Spyware Doctor is good for “Microsoft Windows 7 (32bit, 64bit), Windows Vista SP1+ (32bit, 64bit), Windows XP SP2+ (32bit).”

This is one of the premier, well recognized security programs, and PC Tools is allowing three computers to be protected under one license. That means that, for under seventeen dollars each, three computers can be protected from viruses, spyware, malware, and other security threats.

Spyware Doctor can be purchased with a Gnomie discount here.

Remember: When you use Spyware Doctor, update the security definitions regularly. It is doubtful that malware will decrease any time soon, and security measures are absolutely necessary — unfortunately.

Microsoft Security Essentials

Anti-virus software is necessary nowadays because we are inundated with malware and potential security threats almost daily. If you don’t have virus protection software installed on your computer, you’re putting your computer a great risk. Given all the free anti-virus products available, there really is no excuse not to have virus protection on your Windows computer.

There are numerous third-party products available to protect your computer from viruses either as free anti-virus solutions or for minimal cost. However, if cost is an issue, Microsoft offers a free anti-virus and anti-spyware product called Microsoft Security Essentials, which is on par with many of the pay products in terms of virus and malware protection. Microsoft Security Essentials is easy to install and simple to use. You can learn more about and download Microsoft Security Essentials to protect your computer from security threats.

Twit For Brains

With the events this past week on Twitter surrounding the unfortunate death of a Florida toddler, one cannot help but wonder how much social media is too much. This story has garnered national attention, due to the thousands of tweets flying back and forth between two separate “camps.” One camp — those who are friends of the woman whose son drowned — are rabid in their defense of her. Those on the other side of the issue — who feel that her social activities contributed to her possibly not watching her child — are just as rabid in their opposition. It’s enough to make your head spin, attempting to keep up with everything going on.

I am not going to take any “sides” in this issue, as I feel that’s an absurd thing to do. I don’t know the woman in question, and my heart breaks for her for the loss of her son. However, I can’t help but speak out about the social media aspect. There are times when people turn to it a little TOO much, as well as times when it is used in a completely counterproductive way. As I said in a video earlier… if you have nothing nice to say, keep your mouth shut! Yes, it’s okay for you to question something, or to speak your mind. But do so in a productive and nice way. You don’t have to turn nasty or threatening to get your point across.

In my mind, too much social media comes into play when it dominates your life, and when you rely on it instead of your own family or friends. Yes, online friends are very real, and sometimes even “closer” than your “real-life” ones. However, using social media as your entire outlet and life is not a healthy thing. Make sure that you have activities and hobbies away from your computer. Take the time to reconnect with family or neighbors whom you have lost touch with. Don’t rely solely on the Internet to get comfort and support. That’s my take on it, anyway. What do you think?

This isn’t the only story being talked — or written — about online today, you know. Our community has been busy talking about everything from hardware to Twitter to BumpTop! I hope you’ve taken the time to read some of it today!

Yours digitally,

Chris Pirillo
@ Twitter
@ Facebook

Should Twitter be banned at conferences?

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Malware is on the rise — are you protected?

BumpTop is now available for the Mac!

How do fanboys look at operating systems?

Are you looking for an easy way to come up with a great new domain name?

Have you gotten your Christmas tree yet? I did!

Is Microsoft discriminating against XP 64-bit?

What are the top (predicted) threats to your identity in 2010?

What is there to do in the Netherlands?

AMD is reloading the mobile sector.

GoToAssist can help you provide instant support to clients, friends, or family members.

Does Sirius XM think that it has no competition?

The cure for the AT&T 3G headaches is not available in many areas.

How did you become a hardware junkie?

You must be much more careful than I was when you use a knife.

Xtreme Speed: Breaking the 200 MPH barrier with world-class driving!

Check out the hottest new freeware and shareware.

Are you a planner when it comes to time and money?

Brands that we loved — and lost — in 2009.

Kaspersky speeds up anti-virus scans by a factor of 360!

The Flip UltraHD would make an excellent little stocking stuffer, according to Matt.

What is a PPU, and why should gamers care?

A Gnomie Discount For SUPERAntiSpyware

Online advertising is so pervasive that most people barely glance at it. Advertising has become part of the Internet landscape. One way that advertisers are hoping to stir interest is to put their advertising on social network sites like Facebook and Twitter. For example, on Twitter, you would see someone you follow post a link. A click leads to advertising. This has been called in-stream advertising. It carries the weight of someone with whom you have some familiarity online, and it increases the chances that you will click and look at that link.

This type of advertising also provides hackers and criminals another way to access your computer. That person you follow online may have his/her account hacked and may be unknowingly serving up malicious links.

This is just one scheme to deliver malware to your computer. By the time this paragraph is read, there will be new means to spread malware. The daily news will trigger another flood of malware. There is no doubt that the criminals are fast and creative. There are big dollars to be had and easy targets to be found online.

That is why security programs are necessary for protecting your computer from these infections. We repeatedly urge our readers to protect themselves and inform their friends and family. Some of your friends and family may not have the slightest interest in computer security. Those are the people who become easy targets.

You may hear the argument from these people that they are careful online. However, no one can be vigilant 100% of the time. There are drive-by downloads that can install malware on your machine, without your even having to click a link. Sometimes, a person is just tired and errors are made. Hackers count on such errors and an absolutely necessary protection is an excellent security regime on your computer. You should have an anti-virus, a firewall, and at least one anti-spyware program running at all times. For an anti-spyware program, we are recommending SUPERAntiSpyware. We have an excellent deal for you that offers real time protection:

SUPERAntiSpyware has real-time blocking of threats! Prevent potentially harmful software from installing or re-installing! First Chance Prevention examines over 50 critical points of your system each time your system starts up and shuts down to eliminate threats before they have a chance to infect and infiltrate your system.

The program offers much, much more and you can read about it at the links provided. SUPERAntiSpyware will detect and remove spyware, adware, malware, Trojans, dialers, worms, keyloggers, hijackers, rootkits, and many other types of threats. This program is easy to use and it is effective. SUPERAntispyware is being offered at a special rate for our readers. There is a ten dollar ($10.00) saving, until December 3, 2009.

This is a program that is highly recommended within the security community. People who work on these pages use it and recommend it, too. We use it. We need it and so do you. We are trying to make it as easy and as economical as possible for you to protect yourself and your computer.

Giving Thanks for SUPERAntiSpyware Deals

Online advertising is so pervasive that most people barely glance at it. Advertising has become part of the Internet landscape. One way that advertisers are hoping to stir interest is to put their advertising on social network sites like Facebook and Twitter. For example, on Twitter, you would see someone you follow post a link. A click leads to advertising. This has been called in-stream advertising. It carries the weight of someone with whom you have some familiarity online, and it increases the chances that you will click and look at that link.

This type of advertising also provides hackers and criminals another way to access your computer. That person you follow online may have his/her account hacked and may be unknowingly serving up malicious links.

This is just one scheme to deliver malware to your computer. By the time this paragraph is read, there will be new means to spread malware. The daily news will trigger another flood of malware. There is no doubt that the criminals are fast and creative. There are big dollars to be had and easy targets to be found online.

That is why security programs are necessary for protecting your computer from these infections. We repeatedly urge our readers to protect themselves and inform their friends and family. Some of your friends and family may not have the slightest interest in computer security. Those are the people who become easy targets.

You may hear the argument from these people that they are careful online. However, no one can be vigilant 100% of the time. There are drive-by downloads that can install malware on your machine, without your even having to click a link. Sometimes, a person is just tired and errors are made. Hackers count on such errors and an absolutely necessary protection is an excellent security regime on your computer. You should have an anti-virus, a firewall, and at least one anti-spyware program running at all times. For an anti-spyware program, we are recommending SUPERAntiSpyware. We have an excellent deal for you that offers real time protection:

SUPERAntiSpyware has real-time blocking of threats! Prevent potentially harmful software from installing or re-installing! First Chance Prevention examines over 50 critical points of your system each time your system starts up and shuts down to eliminate threats before they have a chance to infect and infiltrate your system.

The program offers much, much more and you can read about it at the links provided. SUPERAntiSpyware will detect and remove spyware, adware, malware, Trojans, dialers, worms, keyloggers, hijackers, rootkits, and many other types of threats. This program is easy to use and it is effective. SUPERAntispyware is being offered at a special rate for our readers. There is a ten dollar ($10.00) saving, until December 3, 2009.

This is a program that is highly recommended within the security community. People who work on these pages use it and recommend it, too. We use it. We need it and so do you. We are trying to make it as easy and as economical as possible for you to protect yourself and your computer.