Google Chrome OS – Will It Be Enough To Drop Windows?

During this past week there have been numerous article explaining the new features that the Google Chrome OS will incorporate. Some of the features are compelling and are a definite improvement over Windows. Here are 5 features that I believe may be compelling enough to make one consider dropping Windows.

1. Boot time. Many of you may recall when Bill gates spoke about the next version of Windows booting in under 30 seconds. The speech Mr. Gates made was before Windows Vista was released. Unfortunately this never came to pass. With the Google Chrome OS boot time will be under 10 seconds.

2. Netbooks that are optimized for Google Chrome OS will be using SSD and will boot fast. The Google Chrome OS is a light weight operating system based on Linux and will be open source. Google Chrome OS will not support standard hard disk technology so older netbooks need not apply.

3. Web apps only. Google Chrome OS will support web applications only such as Gmail, Google Docs, and so forth. Nothing gets installed nor updated as is the case with Windows.

4. Google Chrome OS is basically a browser. So if you have used the Chrome browser you are already familiar with the speed in which the browser operates. It is quick. So your operating system will be just as quick if not quicker.

5. Battery life is expected to be about 8 hours. This alone is a huge benefit. For anyone trying to use a laptop at an airport is keenly aware, trying to charge a laptop can sometimes be a trying experience. Have a longer battery life will make those layovers more enjoyable.

One of the draw backs that I see with the Google Chrome OS is that you won’t be able to install the OS on a Windows machine. Another drawback is that the OS will not support desktop computers. So if you want to use Google Chrome OS you will need to buy a new netbook.

Google admits that if people do not buy into the netbook idea, using a browser like operating system and be will to use online applications that they could fail.

What do you think? Would you be willing to give up your Windows machine and sign your computing life over to Google?

Source – Gizmodo

PS For those who are using Apple or Linux machines, do not forget to comment and tell us why you are soooo… smart and the rest of the world is so dumb. :-)

The Big Switch: Rewiring The World, From Edison To Google

There should be an image here!While it may seem that we’re in the midst of an unprecedented technological transition, in The Big Switch: Rewiring The World, From Edison To Google, Nicholas Carr posits that the direction of the digital revolution has a strong historical corollary: electrification. Carr argues that computing, no longer personal, is going the way of a power utility. Manufacturers used to provide their own power (i.e., windmills and waterwheels) until they plugged into the electric grid a hundred years ago.

According to Carr, we’re in the midst of a similar transition in computing, moving from our own private hard drives to the computer as access portal. Soon all companies and individuals will outsource their computing systems, from programming to data storage, to companies with big hard drives in out-of-the-way places. Carr’s analysis of the recent past is clear and insightful as he examines common computing tools that are embedded in the Internet instead of stored on a hard drive, including Google and YouTube.

The social and economic consequences of this transition into the utility age fall somewhere between uncertain and grim, Carr argues. Wealth will be further consolidated into the hands of a few, and specific industries, publishing in particular, will perish at the hands of crowdsourcing and the unbundling of content. However, Carr eschews an entirely dystopian vision for the future, hypothesizing without prognosticating. Perhaps lucky for us, he leaves a great number of questions unanswered.

Are Google, Apple & Facebook Really The New Media Villains? What Do You Think?

Are Google, Apple & Facebook Really The New Media Villains? Some Believe They Are

Once upon a time it was Microsoft who was perceived as the Evil Empire, but with Bill Gates and his foundation giving away Billions, some are saying there are new evils among us. In a recent article over at The Wrap, they interviewed Nicholas Carr. Mr. Carr is a technology writer who has written the book ‘”The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google.” His take on Google, Apple and Facebook seem to illustrate that these corporations are changing. A change that he sees as evil.

In the article he states that:

“These companies have wrapped themselves in a lot of the idealism surrounding the web, but their business realities are beginning to be in conflict with the rhetoric they use to promote themselves,” says Carr.

Apple’s troubles are linked with the iPhone 4 roll-out this summer. And it’s not just the engineering problems: The company’s (read: Steve Jobs’) combative response to customer complaints created enormous friction. That was on top of its decision to call for a police raid on a Gizmodo.com editor’s house after a prototype of the phone leaked. •

Google has presented itself as defender of net neutrality. Last week, however, the company backed away from that stance by entering into a joint agreement with Verizon on a policy for handling internet content. This plan could lead to movie studios being charged extra if they want to deliver high-quality downloads of films, as well as medical companies, sports and gaming.

Facebook found itself embroiled in a debate over privacy concerns earlier this year. News that a loophole in the service’s privacy settings allowed advertisers to access user identification and personal information prompted a massive backlash.

In my personal opinion this is far from being evil when compared to what Microsoft has done in the past. The Redmond giant at times have used their clout to threaten OEM’s forcing them into using Windows. They have successfully used their huge bankroll to crush competitors by threatening to sue them or by just buying up the competition. Lawsuits by the DOJ is a good example of how the government has tried to keep a leash on Microsoft.

But that is just my 2 cents. What is your opinion?

Comments welcome.

Source – The Wrap

Bill Gates Wants Power, Nuclear Power For Green Energy

Bill Gates wants to be a nuclear power player and has forged a deal with his company, Terra Power, and Toshiba to develop nuclear energy using new technology known as  ‘traveling-wave reactors’. With this type of reactor it uses depleted uranium that is being claimed could last for 60 to 100 years or more.  Bill Gates company, Terra Power, believes that this energy source could have the potential to power our energy needs for thousands of years to come.


TerraPower explains the science behind traveling-wave reactors:

A nuclear fission reactor produces and controls the release of energy from splitting atoms of certain heavy elements. The nuclear power plants of today require a full core of fuel made from enriched uranium. The TWR, in contrast, initially contains only a small amount of enriched uranium, which is used to kick off the chain reaction through a core of depleted uranium. The wave of fission would move slowly through this depleted uranium core, splitting many more of the uranium atoms than a conventional reactor would.

Though the first reactors will only be able to produce about 500 megawatt of power, it is hoped that future reactors will hit gigawatt-sized.

So what do you think? Is going nuclear the way to go to get us out of the energy crisis?

Comments welcome.

Source – Fast Company

Source – Fast Company

Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution (25th Anniversary Edition)

There should be an image here!This 25th anniversary edition of Steven Levy’s classic book, Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution traces the exploits of the computer revolution’s original hackers — those brilliant and eccentric nerds from the late 1950s through the early ’80s who took risks, bent the rules, and pushed the world in a radical new direction. With updated material from noteworthy hackers such as Bill Gates, Mark Zukerberg, Richard Stallman, and Steve Wozniak, Hackers is a fascinating story that begins in early computer research labs and leads to the first home computers.

Levy profiles the imaginative brainiacs who found clever and unorthodox solutions to computer engineering problems. They had a shared sense of values, known as “the hacker ethic,” that still thrives today. Hackers captures a seminal period in recent history when underground activities blazed a trail for today’s digital world, from MIT students finagling access to clunky computer-card machines to the DIY culture that spawned the Altair and the Apple II.

Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution (25th Anniversary Edition)

There should be an image here!This 25th anniversary edition of Steven Levy’s classic book, Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution traces the exploits of the computer revolution’s original hackers — those brilliant and eccentric nerds from the late 1950s through the early ’80s who took risks, bent the rules, and pushed the world in a radical new direction. With updated material from noteworthy hackers such as Bill Gates, Mark Zukerberg, Richard Stallman, and Steve Wozniak, Hackers is a fascinating story that begins in early computer research labs and leads to the first home computers.

Levy profiles the imaginative brainiacs who found clever and unorthodox solutions to computer engineering problems. They had a shared sense of values, known as “the hacker ethic,” that still thrives today. Hackers captures a seminal period in recent history when underground activities blazed a trail for today’s digital world, from MIT students finagling access to clunky computer-card machines to the DIY culture that spawned the Altair and the Apple II.

The Big Switch: Rewiring The World, From Edison To Google

There should be an image here!While it may seem that we’re in the midst of an unprecedented technological transition, in The Big Switch: Rewiring The World, From Edison To Google, Nicholas Carr posits that the direction of the digital revolution has a strong historical corollary: electrification. Carr argues that computing, no longer personal, is going the way of a power utility. Manufacturers used to provide their own power (i.e., windmills and waterwheels) until they plugged into the electric grid a hundred years ago.

According to Carr, we’re in the midst of a similar transition in computing, moving from our own private hard drives to the computer as access portal. Soon all companies and individuals will outsource their computing systems, from programming to data storage, to companies with big hard drives in out-of-the-way places. Carr’s analysis of the recent past is clear and insightful as he examines common computing tools that are embedded in the Internet instead of stored on a hard drive, including Google and YouTube.

The social and economic consequences of this transition into the utility age fall somewhere between uncertain and grim, Carr argues. Wealth will be further consolidated into the hands of a few, and specific industries, publishing in particular, will perish at the hands of crowdsourcing and the unbundling of content. However, Carr eschews an entirely dystopian vision for the future, hypothesizing without prognosticating. Perhaps lucky for us, he leaves a great number of questions unanswered.

Bill Gates – “most jobs in the private sector don’t really work on the important problems.”

Last Monday Bill Gates gave speeches at Stanford and U.C. Berkeley.In his speech at Stanford Mr. Gates spoke in the subject of giving back and the best way to make a difference. He was asked the question if  the best way of giving back was through the public and private sector and his reply was:

“most jobs in the private sector don’t really work on the important problems.”

Bill Gates seems to have a different attitude now that he is away from Microsoft, compared to when he was the head honcho for the mega software company. During his stint at Microsoft, one would guess that his priorities were to make as much money as possible, with little regard for the world around him. But now that he and his wife have formed the  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, his priorities have changed drastically and I believe this change is for the better.

One could ask, why has Bill Gates made such a dramatic change in his attitude? I personally believe that Gates has seen the light. One could conclude that he has finally realized that making money does not bring happiness into ones life. I am sure that his wife Melinda has also been instrumental in orchestrating these changes and that giving is in fact better than receiving.

What ever the reasons, I believe we should applaud the efforts of the Bill and Melinda Foundation and their efforts to ease some of the suffering in the world.

Comments welcome.

Source

Domain Name Thefts Are Going Unreported

A New Jersey man has been arrested on felony charges of theft, after he stole the domain name P2P.com from its lawful owners. To add insult to injury the thief than sold the domain name to an unsuspecting NBA player for $110,000. But that is not the entire story. What is amazing is that the domain names owner didn’t even know it had been stolen for some 13 months.

Here is what happened:

Marc Ostrofsky, one of the legitimate owners of P2P.com, estimates that the ownership group spent 30 months and $500,000 trying to reclaim the domain name. They have a pending civil suit against Goncalves and his brother, Madsen and Go Daddy Group, which runs the system Goncalves allegedly hacked.

Madsen, who did not know P2P.com was stolen when he bought it for $111,000, retains the domain name to this day. Madsen did not comment in response to a reporter’s calls.

“The reason this case is so important is that it brings to light the lack of specific laws protecting domain name owners,” Ostrofsky said, insisting that Go Daddy Group was slow to respond to the ownership group’s theft report.

Laurie Anderson, Go Daddy Group’s disputes manager, said safeguards exist. They include a 60-day waiting period before a transaction is finalized, during which time owners are sent an e-mail informing them of the pending sale.

The owners of P2P.com didn’t report its alleged theft in May 2006 for 13 months, she said. That’s one month after Goncalves allegedly sold it to Madsen.

It appears that someone was asleep at the switch when the lawful owners were told of the ownership change, even after being properly notified. The owners made it very easy for the theft to happen. Now that the case is being brought to public attention, it makes one wonder how many others have had their domain name stolen behind their backs.

Comments welcome.

Source.

The Stars Fade On Facebook – Heading For Twitter

Celebrities are finding it hard to know who is who on Facebook. Some are complaining that they are not able to distinguish friends from people who are just plain bored with their lives. Because of this some are making the switch to Twitter.

In a recent article it states that::

After Bill Gates recently admitted that he had given up on Facebook because he couldn’t work out which of his friend requests came from friends and which from very sad people, another of the world’s great famous people has declared her Facebook unfriendliness.

Yes, Martha Stewart, perhaps one of the most iconic cooks, has decided that she is firmly in the Twitter camp and that Facebook just has to face her rejection.

“I just love it (Twitter) so much more than Facebook,” she told the Daily Beast.

Stewart claims she gets more bang per tweet. But why knock Facebook? It’s so homely, so friendly and so very inclusive of every possible political and social view, even frightfully repulsive ones.

But the statement I liked the best was this one from Martha Stewart:

I prefer Twitter as a means of mass communication–it’s the Wal-Mart of the Internet.

I must admit I found Twitter much more to my liking as well. To me it is less time consuming to use. But that is just my opinion.

Comments welcome.

Source.

Throwboy Wave

eGreetings!

Gnomedex is only six weeks away! Make sure you have purchased your tickets and reserved your spot!

What happens when your laptop’s motherboard goes bad?

Do you use a Google cheat sheet?

What are your thoughts on Google Wave?

If you’re looking for the best way to maintain your home or office network, look no further than SolarWinds.

“Instant on” Linux faces stiff competition.

Can a PC made for Vista run XP instead?

Two weeks after buying the iPhone 3G S, are you still happy?

How do you find volunteer opportunities in your community?

GoToAssist can help you provide instant support to clients, friends, or family members.

I am digging my new Throwboy pillows!

Can anything interesting come from a lunch date between Bill Gates and Eric Schmidt?

Google Apps is going to become an OpenID provider.

How can you easily transfer files from a PC to a Mac?

Thousands of medical records have been compromised due to a Trojan.

Capturing images on your screen is pretty simple, right? But what if you want to do more with them? Then you want to snag a copy of SnagIt. How did you ever get along without screen capture software? This one even integrates with AOL instant messenger and potentially your blog, too! Start your next screen capture the right way — manage it with TechSmith’s SnagIt.

Bill Gates Starts New Company Called bgC3

Bill Gates has started a new mysterious company called bgC3 in Kirkland, Washington. According to Todd Bishop, the company may be a think tank for new developments in the science and technology fields. Gates started this new company right after he departed from Microsoft. But what is not known about the company is whether it will develop ideas just for Microsoft.

The bg in the name stands for Bill Gates. The company logo is plain and simple.

Todd also mentions the following in his article:

Federal trademark filings provide more clues – describing bgC3 as a think tank, under a generic trademark classification that corresponds broadly to areas including “scientific and technological services,” “industrial analysis and research,” and “design and development of computer hardware and software.”

But what does bgC3 mean? The logical assumption might be “Bill Gates Company Three” – his third enterprise after Microsoft and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. But that’s only partially right, according to the Gates insider.

The “bg” is Bill Gates, the insider says, but the “C” stands for “catalyst.” The idea is that Gates will play that role as he brings together new people and ideas. The “three” reflects the notion of a third place, apart from Microsoft and the foundation.

It should be interesting to see what Bill Gates come up with from this think tank. Hopefully it will be some ideas to help solve our energy crisis.

Comments welcome.

Source

Connecting With Real People?

The latest Microsoft video is a bit clearer than the first one, as it is apparently aiming to “get back in touch with real people.”

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Truth be known, this one is actually pretty funny.  Not compelling me to do anything with my computing dollars based on the message expressed, but funny. I think it demonstrates that Bill Gates has a sense of humor and perhaps to a larger degree, so does Microsoft. I mean it was at Gnomedex 5.0 where IE 7 was released and its presenter showed the Microsoft Campus as the infamous Death Star – I appreciated this, it made me feel at ease with the presentation.

So what do you think – is Microsoft onto something here? Should it keep working to focus its message down to something you and I actually care about? Or instead, keep going with the video series as it has been?

Microsoft Commercial – Initial Thoughts

As I watched this new Microsoft commercial, I like many others I suspect, found myself scratching my head as to why their ad dollars were being spent on this?

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Now, I was a big fan of Bill Gates “last days” video as he was shown leaving Microsoft. I found the video to be relevant, funny and overall highly entertaining. But this latest commercial is beyond confusing, despite me finding the mugshot on the Clown Club card to be an instant classic.

After researching the point for this commercial further, I learned through the grapevine that Microsoft intended the commercial to be the first of many, in addition to acting as an ice breaker. And to be fair, I realize that they were not looking to do heavy product placement as it might be seem as too obvious, no question about it. But when the viewer needs to watch the video at least four times to fully grasp that the point of its creation, I believe someone needs to locate writers with a stronger ability to communicate a clear storyline.

Microsoft started off with a good approach, seen as humanizing Microsoft and its founder(s). But for the love of Pete, please consider someone other than Seinfeld and maybe even consider integrating a POINT to what is being broadcasted to the masses. Because even an icebreaker should leave the viewer feeling like they gained something from the experience. And unfortunately, that commercial clearly does not.

All of this said, at least Ballmer provides immediate entertainment and a reason why I want what they offer right out of the box!

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