KooLoader v2.5 – Download Manager Freeware

KooLoader is an all in one download manager software that guarantees a worthy Internet downloading experience through the addition of an adaptive download accelerator, segmented downloads for acceleration, and an astounding number of simultaneous downloads. The program offers support for Internet Explorer and Firefox. Any time you need to download something online, copying the URL of that file will prompt KooLoader to automatically paste it into its main window; simply hitting OK in the small window that will be displayed instantly will start the download.

There should be an image here!KooLoader keeps it straight and simple without adding a bunch of useless features that would only crowd your application and encumber your experience, which allows the setting of a portable version to use on different computers with smart file management and multi-language support. A feature which will come in very handy is the Scheduler: with it you can download at times you choose and specify. Apart from this, you have the ability to establish the maximum number of segments and the maximum number of simultaneous downloads (up to 99!).

KooLoader allows you to even use links stored in your clipboard, offering support also for both protocols HTTP and FTP. The user interface is as clean as it can be, providing you with all of its features in the easiest way possible. Comprehensive error recovery and resume capability are included. This mean that you can resume broken downloads that had been interrupted on account of lost connections, network breakdown, or system shutdowns.

[Discovered via Download.com]

[4.58M] [Win98/Me/2k/XP/Vista/7] [FREE (Download KooLoader)]

[Photo above by johntrainor / CC BY-ND 2.0]

Download Manager Freeware – KooLoader v2.5

KooLoader is an all in one download manager software that guarantees a worthy Internet downloading experience through the addition of an adaptive download accelerator, segmented downloads for acceleration, and an astounding number of simultaneous downloads. The program offers support for Internet Explorer and Firefox. Any time you need to download something online, copying the URL of that file will prompt KooLoader to automatically paste it into its main window; simply hitting OK in the small window that will be displayed instantly will start the download.

There should be an image here!KooLoader keeps it straight and simple without adding a bunch of useless features that would only crowd your application and encumber your experience, which allows the setting of a portable version to use on different computers with smart file management and multi-language support. A feature which will come in very handy is the Scheduler: with it you can download at times you choose and specify. Apart from this, you have the ability to establish the maximum number of segments and the maximum number of simultaneous downloads (up to 99!).

KooLoader allows you to even use links stored in your clipboard, offering support also for both protocols HTTP and FTP. The user interface is as clean as it can be, providing you with all of its features in the easiest way possible. Comprehensive error recovery and resume capability are included. This mean that you can resume broken downloads that had been interrupted on account of lost connections, network breakdown, or system shutdowns.

[Discovered via Download.com]

[4.58M] [Win98/Me/2k/XP/Vista/7] [FREE (Download KooLoader)]

[Photo above by johntrainor / CC BY-ND 2.0]

One Good Reason Not To Store Everything On Your Hard Drive – Especially Videos

As many of you know, I am in Texas this week visiting the kids. Today I am trying — notice that word TRYING — to un-gunk a hard disk that has been completely filled to the brim with home videos. Let me start from the beginning. Upon our arrival on Monday evening, I was told that the household laptop was running slow. A check of the hard disk showed that it was filled, with only 1% of the drive available. This is a Windows XP machine with only a 60 GB hard disk.

I found a folder which contained 16.9 GB of video files. These were home movies of various family functions. I went down to Walmart and picked up a pack of DVDs to transfer the files to. But when you have a hard disk that has no room left for virtual memory, the process is slower than molasses. LOL.

So what is virtual memory and why is it so important? This is a very basic description:

Windows Virtual Memory is a portion of hard disk space which acts like RAM in your computer. For example, if you have a virtual memory of 100 MB, then this will act as 100 MB RAM in your computer in case your actual RAM installed is not sufficient for the CPU to carry on all the current running processes smoothly.

The bottom line is this. If you jam pack your hard drive full, there will be very limited room for your system to use virtual memory, and the system will run slowly. By removing huge files from the system, this will free up more space and will increase the efficiency of your computer.

Unfortunately this laptop I am working on also has a  virus!

I hope this helps someone out there in computer land.

Brainstorm: Harnessing The Power Of Productive Obsessions

There should be an image here!It’s true: a mind is a terrible thing to waste. Yet that’s what we do when we spend our weekend — and neurons — reliving a workplace squabble, spend a family visit chewing over childhood issues, or spend hours beating ourselves up when someone brings one of our own long-held (but never worked on) ideas to fruition.

This kind of obsessing gets us, like a hamster on a wheel, nowhere. But as noted creativity expert Eric Maisel asserts, obsessing productively leads to fulfillment rather than frustration. A productive obsession, whether an idea for a novel, a business, or a vaccine, is chosen deliberately and pursued with determination. In Brainstorm: Harnessing The Power Of Productive Obsessions, Maisel coaches you to use the tendency to obsess to your creative advantage, fulfilling both your promise and your promises to yourself.

Brainstorm: Harnessing The Power Of Productive Obsessions

There should be an image here!It’s true: a mind is a terrible thing to waste. Yet that’s what we do when we spend our weekend — and neurons — reliving a workplace squabble, spend a family visit chewing over childhood issues, or spend hours beating ourselves up when someone brings one of our own long-held (but never worked on) ideas to fruition.

This kind of obsessing gets us, like a hamster on a wheel, nowhere. But as noted creativity expert Eric Maisel asserts, obsessing productively leads to fulfillment rather than frustration. A productive obsession, whether an idea for a novel, a business, or a vaccine, is chosen deliberately and pursued with determination. In Brainstorm: Harnessing The Power Of Productive Obsessions, Maisel coaches you to use the tendency to obsess to your creative advantage, fulfilling both your promise and your promises to yourself.

Common Computer Cleanup Mistakes

Q: Since February 8th was supposedly ‘Clean Out Your Computer Day’ (I missed it), what should I be doing to clean out my computer? — Irene

A: This event was clearly a PR stunt by someone in the computer business. Performing routine maintenance on your computer is always a good idea but I would recommend that you do it more frequently than once a year!

While managing your files is important for organizational purposes, getting rid of files because someone created a national day to remind you to do is a bit disconcerting to me.

There is a major misconception amongst non-technical computer users that deleting files from your computer will somehow improve the performance.

A computer that has 100 data files will run no faster than a computer that has 10,000 data files stored on it purely based on the number of files. The only impact that a large volume of files will have on a computer is that it will fill up your computer’s hard drive. Think of it like your refrigerator; it stores the ingredients that you use for cooking, but has little to do with how fast you can prepare a meal.

If your computer’s hard drive is getting close to full, then getting the ‘urge to purge’ makes sense but don’t expect any tangible performance gain (unless your hard drive is completely full and out of operating space).

You can easily check to see how full your hard drive is by opening up My Computer and right-clicking on the C: drive, then selecting Properties.

A pie chart should come up with the blue section representing your data and the purple section representing your free space. If the purple section is a tiny sliver, then it’s time to start removing unneeded items; if not, don’t get too concerned about deleting old files.

The quickest way to free up large quantities of disk space is to uninstall unnecessary programs, which take up lots more space than documents and spreadsheets. Pictures, music and especially video files are the most common ‘data’ files that can take up significant space only if you have large quantities of them.

To remove unneeded programs, start by looking for an Uninstall option in the Programs section of each application from the Start menu. If you don’t find an option there, you can open the Control Panel and click on the Add/Remove programs option.

A Word of Warning!

Removing items just because you don’t know what they are is very dangerous. We constantly see customers in our stores that are suffering from ‘self inflicted deletion wounds’ because they started mass deleting files and programs that they didn’t recognize.

A more relevant cleanup process that can improve performance is built into the Windows operating system and should be performed at least every couple of months.

The Disk Cleanup utility (Start / Programs / Accessories / System Tools) will track down lots of extraneous files that build up as a natural course of using your computer and get rid of them all at once.

Beware of companies that may try to take advantage of any press that ‘Clean Out Your Computer Day’ receives by trying to sell you a magical program that will clean up your computer for you.

Windows based ‘Registry’ system is extremely complicated, so these ‘cleanup programs’ must guess what needs to stay and what it thinks it can remove. If they guess wrong, you end up with a much bigger problem that can be very costly to fix. All too often, we see folks bringing in crashed systems that say ‘everything was working fine until I installed XXX cleanup program,’ so be very mindful of any third party programs that claim to perform miracles for $29.95!

Ken Colburn
Data Doctors Computer Services
Data Doctors Data Recovery Labs
Data Doctors Franchise Systems, Inc.
Weekly video tech contributor to CNN.com
Host of the award-winning “Computer Corner” radio show

Name Your Files So They Are Easier To Find

File management is not just about creating folders and organizing your files within them. Part of file management is about developing a good naming convention for files. In doing so, you do not have to open countless documents but rather just look at the file name to identify the contents.

So what is a good naming convention? Although there is no one method to use, there are some tips to follow that will help you establish a good naming convention that works for you.

  1. Include the date in the file name
    By including the date that the file was created in the file name, you can easily identify when a file was composed, thereby narrowing down your search when you are looking for specific files.
  2. Include the receiver’s name in the file name
    By including the receiver or recipient’s name in the file name, you can easily identify for whom a file is written. Pair the recipient’s name with the date of creation and you will have no problems finding specific files.

    This is more applicable to files such as memos, letters, notes, contracts, etc.

  3. Specify the document type in the file name
    This is one file naming tip that I consistently use. If I am creating a template, I include the word “template” in the file name. If I am creating a contract, I include the word “contract” in the file name. I’m sure you get the picture.
  4. Use version control
    If you have multiple versions of the same file, be sure to use some kind of numbering so you can identify which one is the most recent. A simple method is to simple include “v1, v2, v3, etc.” in the file name, depending on which iteration you are working on.
    By following some of these tips, you should be well on your way to establishing a good file naming convention.

Manage Your Files More Effectively With These Tips Part II

In Part I, I presented you with a few tips for better organizing your files. We left off at tip #5 so let’s continue you on with a few others.

6. Use specific file names
Using specific file names will make it easier to identify what the file is about without having to open it. Generic names such as document, file, letter, memo, etc., will be of no help when trying to find a file.

7. Save As when you create a new document
I recommend getting into the habit of doing a Save As when you immediately create a new document. File the document into the correct folder and give it a descriptive name. The more you make this a habit, the more likely you are to keep consistency.

8. Make it routine to clear out old files
It does not take long to accumulate hundreds of files. Therefore, you should make it part of your regular maintenance routine to go through your folders and clear out those files that you no longer use. I’m not suggesting you delete these files. Instead, move them into a separate folder called Inactive, Old, or Archive.

9. Place most frequently used files at the top
If there are files that you use more than others, you can put them at the top of the list within a folder so you do not have to scroll through the folder contents to locate them. By adding the letters “AA” to the beginning of a file name, the file will appear in the top of the list.

10. Back up, Back up, Back up
Establish a regular routine for backing up your files on a regular basis. If anything ever happens to your hard drive, you can quickly restore all your files.

Manage Your Files More Effectively With These Tips Part I

File management is not storing all your files on the desktop. Nor is it storing files in two or three generic folders. Good file management is about a cohesive folder structure and a specific file naming convention. The goal of making it easy to find the file you are looking for, whether you created the file yesterday or five years ago.

Here are a few tips you can use in your file management strategy:

  1. Store applications in one folder
    When you install an application, you usually have the option of choosing where to store the application’s executable and other files. By storing all applications in a single folder, such as the Programs Folder, it will be much easier to locate them.
  2. Create a single top-level folder
    I highly recommend that you create a single folder for storing your documents. Alternatively, you can use the My Documents folder. Doing so makes backing up your files much easier. All you have to do is backup the main folder since the backup will include all the folder contents.
  3. Create subfolders within a main folder
    When I recommended creating one folder, I was not suggesting that all files be dumped into one folder. You should create subfolders to organize your files, such as you would use file folders within a filing cabinet. For example, if you create files for different projects, you should create a subfolder for each project. Be sure to use descriptive names for subfolders so you can easily identify the contents within each one.
  4. Create a second level of subfolders
    Within your main folder, create a single layer of subfolders based on topics, projects, etc. Within each of these subfolders, you can nest additional folders to further organize files. Keep in mind though, the more levels of subfolders you create, the more difficult it becomes to search for files.
  5. Follow a consistent file naming convention
    There is no right or wrong naming convention for files. Some people include spaces, uppercase letters, lowercase letters, etc. The important thing is that once you decide on a naming convention stick with it for consistency.

In Part II of Manage your Files More Effectively, I will provide you with a few more tips to include in your file management strategy.

PFrank

I usually dump all my music into one folder. I guess it was a bad habit that I never really broke myself from. With all these music files dumped into one big folder, my naming of all the files wasn’t exactly neat. I needed to find a free program that would help me in making order out of all this chaos. I found that in PFrank.
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