Canon PIXMA MG5220 Wireless All In One Printer – Reviewed

My 8-year-old HP All In One printer has been having issues for the past few months, so I have been in the market for a replacement. I mainly make copies and some minor color printing, with my main printing needs handled by my HP Laserjet. I also wanted a printer that worked wirelessly, but the most important feature had to be the availability of cheap ink. I didn’t want to be gouged for $50 or $60 for replacement cartridges. During my entire computing career, I have been a slave to HP printers. I have helped build the HP empire to what it is today, just in the cost of printer cartridges that I have paid for over the years. LOL.

Since before the holidays, I have looking been roaming the Internet looking for a new All In One printer. I finally decided on the Canon PIXMA MG5200. I bought it at Amazon for $89.99. I also ordered a pack of 5 remanufactured print cartridges for $20.50 which included shipping.

The printer arrived Thursday afternoon, and I had to put away my other toys, while I setup my new toy. After getting the printer out of the box, and installed the print cartridges, my first task was to set up the printer to my wireless network. I would recommend you follow the instructions that come with the unit and make sure you follow the procedure as specified. After finishing the wireless part, I tried to print from my personal laptop, without installing the software provided. It worked.

I am not a huge fan of software that comes with printers. I have not installed the software that came with the printer yet, so I can not comment on it.

I have 4 computers connected to the printer, all using Windows 7, except for one older laptop using Windows XP SP3. All work just fine printing.

Manual copying and scanning also works fine.

But this is where the little box shines. I had a photo on a memory card that I printed on photo paper. The results were stunning. The images were sharp and clear and rivaled in quality to what Walgreens and Wal-Mart offers.

There is only one thing I don’t care for. The printer is a shiny black plastic that looks sharp. But fingerprints and dust cling like a magnet.

Comments welcome.

Canon PIXMA MG5220 Wireless Inkjet Photo All-In-One (4502B017)

6 PKS GENERIC INK CANON PGI-225 CLI-226 Pixma iP4820 MG5220

Reducing Your Printing Costs

There should be an image here!Many of our readers are students. At this time of the year, papers are due and the bank account is looking somewhat grim. Here is a saving for printing out all those term papers and projects.

123InkJets is offering a 15% discount on compatible ink. Use this link, and this code for the discount: FLOWER23. Depending on the size of the order, U.S. orders may receive free shipping.

This offer is valid until April 3rd, 2010.

Here are a couple of testimonials from Gnomies who have used this service:

“123inkjets is a great resource for anyone who need printer ink fast and at an affordable price. The refurbished ink cartridges have a quality that is indistinguishable from name brand ink. The ink is shipped UPS ground, however I usually receive it before the “estimated” date of delivery. They always have a coupon of some sort, which makes the savings even better!” — Justin in Arizona

“It was a huge savings and no different than what you can buy from the stores here. No more driving all over town to find what I need.” — Jenn in North Carolina

You know that the printer runs out of the ink at the worst times. At these prices and with the discount, you can be prepared. And to all those students who are heading into the final weeks of the term, good luck!

15% Gnomie Discount For 123InkJets

There should be an image here!Many of our readers are students. At this time of the year, papers are due and the bank account is looking somewhat grim. Here is a saving for printing out all those term papers and projects.

123InkJets is offering a 15% discount on compatible ink. Use this link, and this code for the discount: FLOWER23. Depending on the size of the order, U.S. orders may receive free shipping.

This offer is valid until April 3rd, 2010.

Here are a couple of testimonials from Gnomies who have used this service:

“123inkjets is a great resource for anyone who need printer ink fast and at an affordable price. The refurbished ink cartridges have a quality that is indistinguishable from name brand ink. The ink is shipped UPS ground, however I usually receive it before the “estimated” date of delivery. They always have a coupon of some sort, which makes the savings even better!” — Justin in Arizona

“It was a huge savings and no different than what you can buy from the stores here. No more driving all over town to find what I need.” — Jenn in North Carolina

You know that the printer runs out of the ink at the worst times. At these prices and with the discount, you can be prepared. And to all those students who are heading into the final weeks of the term, good luck!

Inksaving Font – Download Ecofont

According to its Web site, Ecofont can save anywhere from 20% to 25% of the ink or toner we use. Ecofont uses a font called Spranq_eco_sans_regular to perform the magic. So how does it work? It is actually fairly simple. Inside of the font itself are small circles that use no ink, but are invisible to the naked eye. The font blown up looks like this:

By setting the font as your default you can start saving on ink immediately.

Give it a try and see what you think.

Comments welcome.

Source

Printed Silicon Ink Chips – Boon or Bust?

Printed chips could be a boon for one Silicon Valley firm that hopes that the printed chips could assist consumers. Using silicon ink to print the chips, the chips could contained data to help consumers make the right purchase. So what makes printed chips so attractive? They could be inexpensive to produce compared to traditional silicon chips.

Over at the San Jose Mercury News, they state the following information:

Until now, creating the microchips that power all of our electronic gadgets has been a laborious, complex and time-consuming process costing billions of dollars.

But if a Milpitas-based startup succeeds, making them could be as easy as printing a piece of paper.

And that could open up a huge market for so called “printed semiconductors,” which would contain an enormous amount of data but would be cheap enough to slap on thousands of products. Imagine going to the grocery store and being able to find out what wine works best with your favorite chicken recipe.

Backed by investors who include former San Francisco 49ers Brent Jones and Tommy Vardell — and a board that boasts Sun Microsystems co-founder Vinod Khosla — privately held Kovio hopes to launch in a matter of weeks what is believed to be the world’s first manufacturing plant for printed semiconductors.

By using inkjet and other types of printers, the company plans to make radio frequency identification devices — so called RFID tags. Such tags traditionally contain microchips, but are so expensive now their use has been relatively limited.

If Kovio succeeds in keeping the price of the devices low, according to its executives and others familiar with the company, it could herald a new era for consumers and the chip business.

But will this be enough to make the printed chips successful? We won’t know the answer to that question until we see the final product. I must admit that if this does come about, we could be looking at a new era in technology.

Comments as always are welcome.

Source

PrintFriendly

The majority of my work is done digitally and I hardly ever have to print anything. In fact, I wish I didn’t need a printer, but sure enough, I end up having to print something just often enough that it wouldn’t make any sense for me to get rid of my printer. I only print things a handful of times per month, so I’m not a big printer, but some people I know go through paper like you wouldn’t believe. They print anything and everything, and besides wasting ink, this approach also wastes paper. Maybe you do legitimately have to print a lot of stuff, but there are probably elements of the things you’re printing that don’t need to be there. A service called PrintFriendly helps you to get the most out of your resources.

The idea is that the site can optimize any Web site to become much more appropriate to print. Their representation of a page will likely be different than what you see when you normally visit the site. You can remove images, delete unwanted sections, and print your customized version of the content. This formatting can also be sent to a PDF file, and a bookmarklet exists to make the functionality easily accessible. Content providers can even get a PrintFriendly button for their sites. The service didn’t seem to work correctly in every situation, but I like the goal behind what it’s trying to do.

Who’s Using A Kodak Printer? Opinions Needed

Kodak is filling the airwaves where I live with a host of Kodak printer commercials. The main theme is how others like HP, Canon or whoever, are ripping us off in the price they charge for ink. Kodak claims that their ink is so cheap, it borders on being almost free. OK. I exaggerated slightly.

Last evening I went over to Amazon and took a look at some of the Kodak printers they were selling. I also read quite a few reviews that was a mixed bag of nuts. Some love the printers while others did not. The all in one design feature, some with the ability to send faxes, seemed reasonably priced and on par with the cost from other OEM’s. But I have been an HP fan for years and struggle with the premise of changing brands.

So this is where you come in. If you own a Kodak printer share your opinion with us, good or bad. What do you like and dislike about the printer? Are the cartridges really as cheap as Kodak says they are?

Comments welcome.

A Portrait Of The Mother As A Young Lady With Notebooks And Flatscreens

Kodak Easy Share Printers + Cheap Ink

On Thursday night the TV program Celebrity Apprentice had the contestants come up with a slogan and sales pitch for the Kodak Easy Share printers being introduced by the company. Seems that the biggest selling feature of these new printers will be their less expensive replacement ink cartridges. So I wondered over to the Kodak site and took a look at some of the models they have to offer.

Black cartridges are $9.99 and color cost only $14.99. For those of us who have HP printers we know that the cost of cartridges are usually double these prices for some models.  Kodak is also offering a wide variety of different models with different capabilities. Prices also seem to be consist with other printers on the market.

Their Model 5100 which is an all-in-one [ print, copy & scan] which retails for $129.99 is currently on sale until 01-27-08 for $50.00 off. At only $79.99 this appears to be one heck of a deal.

If you are in he market for a new printer you may wish to consider the Kodak models. I know I may just get a Kodak just because of the low price replacement cartridges. It should be interesting to see if other manufactures like HP lower the cost of their cartridges as well.

Has anyone bought one of these new printers? If so let us know what you think.

Comments welcome.

Kodak printers here.

[tags]kodak, printers, new, models, cheap, ink, replacement, cartridges, apprentice, tv, celebrity,  [/tags]

I *Heart* My OfficeJet G85

The inkjet printer market cracks me up. So many advances in print quality and technology, and yet most major manufacturers seem to design their printers to drive the sale of ink cartridges. Why do you think they are so eager to give many printers away these days? I mean… really… have you seen the size of some of the ink cartridges on many new inkjet printers? Do they have a shrink-ray on the assembly line, or did they leave them in the dryer too long? It seems like each year, they get smaller. As Gnomies, this is probably not much of a revelation.

Which brings me to why I love my HP OfficeJet G85 all-in-one. It’s been my printing, scanning, copying, and faxing workhorse for over four years now. It won’t win any prizes for print quality, although it holds its own on text and basic graphics. Plus it’s built like a Sherman tank. And speaking of tanks, its ink cartridges are massive compared to the carts I’ve seen in most comparable AIOs on the market today. To give you an idea, I ran a little experiment on ink cartridge life. It wasn’t a scientific experiment by any stretch, but it did reinforce what I already knew.

Almost a year ago, I purchased some replacement carts (it takes one black + one tri-color cartridge). For yuks, I thought I’d try an OfficeMax brand cart, just to see how long it would last over time. When I put the carts in, I printed out a self-test page that contained a page count. I marked the date on it, then taped it to the side of the printer. I actually had forgotten I did that, when I noticed the print quality was fading. So I popped out the old ones and put in some new HP brand replacement carts. As I said, it was almost a year ago when I started the experiment, and when I looked at the new self-test page, the old carts had lasted nearly 800 pages. Perhaps a testament to the OfficeMax brand carts, but more likely an indicator of the volume of ink they contained. I’ll let you know how long the HP carts last me, but it may be a while.

Ink carts are a major cash cow for printer makers. Everybody knows it. Roughly a year ago, HP just stopped short of filing a lawsuit against CartridgeWorld, citing patent infringement. Personally, my theory is that it felt a threat against that cash cow, and patent infringement is just a convenient cover. Once in a while, I’ll see some sexy new all-in-one gracing the aisles of my nearest big box store. It slices, dices, has built-in Wi-Fi, and a color LCD. But it has tiny ink tanks. Small tanks = no, thanks.

[tags]InkJet, printer cartridge, toner, ink, printer, print, OfficeJet, G85, all in one[/tags]

Buying A Printer? But How Long Will It Last?

Printers, like so many other pieces of electronic equipment produced nowadays, last forever, even though in some cases they may be considered obsolete a year or two down the road.

But you don’t need to care about obsolete if you’re a student, or an individual who makes personal use of it, or even a SOHO entrepreneur who doesn’t offer graphic arts or desktop publishing services. Obsolete is just a word that manufacturers and retailers made up to suggest it belongs in the trash, when all it really means is there is a new, improved model out there.
Continue reading “Buying A Printer? But How Long Will It Last?”

Printer Ink Cartridge Refill Reviews

Based on Dan’s post on HP Inkjet Printer Cartridges, we (naturally) received a handful of feedback. I haven’t used an inkjet in years, and was actually considering picking up a new laser printer before too long. 99% of what I print out is text, so black toner is fine for me. Most Gnomies likely have inkjets, however – so what William H. Heino, Sr. says might pertain to you:

“HP ink cartridges have warranties. When you get a bad ink cartridge, they give you another one. That’s the way a warranty works. When you buy a recycled ink cartridge, with no warranty, it may work momentarily. Why should my printer shut down after purchasing a recycled ink cartridge – only to work again when an HP ink cartridge is inserted? HP forces you, according to pre-determined usage, to buy their ink cartridges – or they’ll effectively shut your printer down. Hewlett Packard recycles their ink cartridges by promoting that HP cartridges be returned for recycling using a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Allowing HP, through their “refurbishing and reselling” effort to conserve resources, to use the various recycling facilities of manufacturers around the world contracted through HP. There are other recyclers available to refurbish and recycle ink cartridges, but HP has potentially restricted the consumer the full use and operation of HP printers.

I can see why William would be frustrated, but that’s the price you pay (literally) for buying and using an HP printer. If you don’t like the way HP plays ball, then they have plenty of competitors. Let your pocketbook do the talking, dude. Nobody’s forcing anybody to buy HP products in the first place. Of course, William’s feedback was based on our original HP Slaps Cartridge World With Patent Infringement article.
Continue reading “Printer Ink Cartridge Refill Reviews”