TSA Employee Goes Berserk And Beats Fellow Worker After Tiny Penis Insult

During training of TSA workers, one employee was singled out for jokes, when his small penis was exposed on a scanning device. The scanners are used as the latest gadget in our fight against terrorism, but may be showing more than we have been lead to believe. In fact employee Rolando Negrin’s who works at the Miami airport, began to receive insults from fellow employees and finally became fed up. He took one employee to task for the insults in an employee parking lot, and  using a metal baton he inflicted a little corporal punishment. Roland ended up being arrested for the incident.

In a recent article it also stated that:

Screeners in a separate room view images of the human body, private parts and all, with the person’s face blurred. The machines have raised concerns from the American Civil Liberties Union, which says they represent an invasion of passengers’ privacy.

Florida ACLU Director Howard Simon said he frowns on the “electronic strip search” and called on the government to use less invasive security technology.

“Ribbing and fighting among TSA workers — it’s a sad story. It’s an unnecessary story,” Simon said Thursday. “The government is being seduced by new technology.”

TSA spokesman Jonathan Allen, in a statement issued Thursday, said that Negrin is being suspended and an internal inquiry is being launched.

“TSA has a zero-tolerance policy for workplace violence,” he said. “We are investigating to determine whether training procedures were violated and will take appropriate action as necessary.”

I’m sure more training is going to solve the problem. Right! Let’s be honest here folks. I am in favor of having our safety protected. But image scanners that show our private parts seems just a little over board. IMHO.

What do you think?

Comments welcome.

Source

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Facebook Proven Just Creepy

Sometimes Facebook is so wrong in its approach to life that it frightens me. Take its departure page for those who look to leave Facebook as one such example.

As you leave Facebook, you are reminded of all of your friends, who will “miss you.” Not just in a plural sense, rather, with each picture and a weak caption to guilt you into staying.

Facebook clearly has no shame, whatsoever, in reminding the departing user of their “friends” as they choose to shut down their account. Clearly, there is not only a lack of privacy respect. There is a general lack of respect of the Facebook users in general. And this is sad.

[awsbullet:facebook privacy]

Facebook: Where Common Sense Ends And A Privacy Vacuum Begins

Facebook is becoming a bit of a battleground where avoidable exploits are dealt with after the fact. And this is a real crying shame, as Facebook has a lot going for it. The most recent incident involving a lack of Facebook security was an apparent chat exploit. In response, Facebook disabled chat for a time so that it could address the security breach.

Speaking for myself, I think this is one of this issues that should have never happened. Worse is that people still put their trust in social networking sites to a degree, and that they are willing to post all sort of personal information about themselves — often without regard of the consequences.

Things have apparently been a big enough deal that lawmakers here in the States are looking into stepping in. So it’s clear now that it is in the best interest of Facebook and others to encourage people to be a little less forthcoming with their personal info and for these services to nix the need to be sneaky with their privacy policies.

[awsbullet:facebook privacy]

Consumers Still Act Like Dummies Online And Share Private Information

In what should not come as a surprise, but still does, it seems that consumers still are using the Internet like a toy. In a recent survey by Consumer Reports, 52% of respondents have posted personal information online. It gets better. These people have posted their home addresses, date of birth, and also information about their children. Unbelievable!

But when it comes to social networking sites, the numbers are less:

On Facebook only, 42 percent have posted their date of birth, 7 percent have posted street addresses, and 3 percent have disclosed when they were away from home. About 23 percent of Facebook users, meanwhile, are either unaware that Facebook has privacy controls that protect this information or do not use them.

Another 26 percent of Facebook users post their children’s photos and names, which could potentially expose them to predators, the report said.

Of the 18.4 million people who have installed Facebook apps, 38 percent were confident that the apps were secure or had not thought about. About 1.8 million computers were infected by social networking apps in the past year, Consumer Reports said.

Now that’s good news. Only 42% are idiots when it comes to posting information on Facebook! What is wrong with people?

There was also this:

Overall, Consumer Reports found that 1.7 million online households were victims of Web-related ID theft in the last year, 5.4 million online consumers submitted personal data via phishing e-mails, and that cyber-crime has cost American consumers $4.5 billion over the past two years, trashing an estimated 2.1 million computers.

Solving this problem doesn’t require expensive technology, however, the report concluded. “It requires the networks themselves to keep improving their privacy practices and better educating users,” the report said.

Better educate users? Where do these people live? In a cave? LOL

Comments welcome.

Source

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Facebook Makes Event Planning Easy

Facebook has a very easy to use event planner which now includes a quick way to easily share your plans. A user needs only to click on the ‘Events’ box and use the What Are You Planning to quickly type in an event.

Users can also create an event by going to the Event dashboard in the left side menu.By clicking on the ‘create an event’ button and filling out the fields, you will have a more detailed formal event announcement.

The folks at Facebook also state:

You can also choose between two types of events: a public event, available for anyone to RSVP and attend, and a private event. Private events will only be visible to people who have been invited, and only invited people can see the event in their News Feed.

Events created before this launch will maintain all of their settings. Going forward, all new events you create will follow this new format.

It seems that this added improvement to event planning will make it easier to plan events on the spur of the moment.

Source

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Facebook Privacy Goes Down The Tubes – Again

Despite Facebook being an amazing place for developers and users alike, sometimes their little “security holes” are so avoidable, it borders on mind blowing.

Take this latest personal security issue where complete strangers, can actually see which events you plan on attending. Obviously for virtual events, this is not a big deal. But when you attend a real event and Facebook in turn, broadcasts it to the world. Well, no good can come of it.

I think that Facebook needs to remember that at one time, MySpace was the flavor of the month. And despite the massive successes that Facebook has seen, they are not bullet proof.

Facebook Is Not A Threat To Google

I grow so tired of articles like these claiming that Google may be looking at stiff competition because Facebook is so innovative. Please, give me a break. Let me point out why I totally think this is complete nonsense.

1) Both Google and Facebook are terrible with privacy. No secret there. And neither has really done much to correct the problem, except offer band-aid solutions after people complain.

2) This “newfound,” all knowing power everyone is going on about is exactly why most people I know work overtime to opt-out of just about everything Facebook throws at us. Share this, in real time, as you’re doing it? Yeah, that sounds a lot like what happened with Google Buzz. No thanks, Facebook.

3) Consumer insights are fine when they are semi-anonymous. Basic demographic info and limited cookie use? Fine. But the areas that Facebook wants to dive into will make phishing schemes feel like a back-rub once the consumer groups dig into this.

4) People come to Facebook to sell, buy, relax, communicate, and play. They do not come there to have their privacy trampled. Anyone who allows Facebook to do this is asking for problems.

5) Insights vs. relevant results. Using Facebook for searching is a lot like playing ping-pong with a live grenade. It’ll work all right, until you accidentally share those anniversary plans with your wife. Flowers, check. Fancy reservations at the resort from a fan page, check. Your wife watching all of this unfold in your profile… priceless.

[awsbullet:Aldous Huxley Brave New World]

Windows Live Users May Be Sharing More Than They Think

There should be an image here!Microsoft may be mining and sharing data it collects from Windows Live users without their knowledge, according to the top story in today’s Windows Secrets Newsletter.

Using addresses pulled from subscribers’ instant messaging and Hotmail Contacts lists, Microsoft takes information from public sources that used to have a very narrow distribution, mashes it together, and sends it out to a wider audience than ever before, in the interest of creating social networks, the story says.

“Social networks are nothing new and subscribers to sites like Facebook and Twitter fully expect their comments and information to be publicly displayed,” said Woody Leonhard, a senior editor for Windows Secrets and writer of this week’s top story. “What Microsoft is doing is taking information that used to be restricted to a very narrow audience — certain blog readers and Live Spaces subscribers, for example — and shooting it out to people you may have never even met — all in an attempt to get a finger in the social networking pie.”

Leonhard states in the article that while Microsoft has not specifically revealed how it obtains its private contact and communication information, his research indicates that the data is collected from users subscribing to Windows Live Messenger and Hotmail. The information is then passed along to other users as a way for them to expand their networks and to obtain status updates from their network members. The information shared could include status posts intended for a small circle of friends or contact list updates that could potentially be embarrassing to unsuspecting users.

“Microsoft has stepped over the line in an attempt to join the social networking space,” said Brian Livingston, editorial director of WindowsSecrets.com. “Sharing with perfect strangers private communications that are intended for a small group is not only ethically questionable but opens the door for legal concerns as well, given that posts and messages intended for a very limited number of people are being displayed for the whole world to see.”

Click here to read the entire story and Microsoft’s response.

Published since 2003, the Windows Secrets Newsletter reveals tricks and workarounds to get the most out of Microsoft Windows. Employing six full-time staff members, WindowsSecrets.com publishes the work of several contributing editors including Fred Langa, Ryan Russell, and Susan Bradley. For more information, visit the WS Lounge at Lounge.WindowsSecrets.com or the newsletter’s home page at WindowsSecrets.com.

[Photo above by Subterranean Tourist Board / CC BY-ND 2.0]

Microsoft Trades Privacy For Social Networking Capabilities

There should be an image here!Microsoft may be mining and sharing data it collects from Windows Live users without their knowledge, according to the top story in today’s Windows Secrets Newsletter.

Using addresses pulled from subscribers’ instant messaging and Hotmail Contacts lists, Microsoft takes information from public sources that used to have a very narrow distribution, mashes it together, and sends it out to a wider audience than ever before, in the interest of creating social networks, the story says.

“Social networks are nothing new and subscribers to sites like Facebook and Twitter fully expect their comments and information to be publicly displayed,” said Woody Leonhard, a senior editor for Windows Secrets and writer of this week’s top story. “What Microsoft is doing is taking information that used to be restricted to a very narrow audience — certain blog readers and Live Spaces subscribers, for example — and shooting it out to people you may have never even met — all in an attempt to get a finger in the social networking pie.”

Leonhard states in the article that while Microsoft has not specifically revealed how it obtains its private contact and communication information, his research indicates that the data is collected from users subscribing to Windows Live Messenger and Hotmail. The information is then passed along to other users as a way for them to expand their networks and to obtain status updates from their network members. The information shared could include status posts intended for a small circle of friends or contact list updates that could potentially be embarrassing to unsuspecting users.

“Microsoft has stepped over the line in an attempt to join the social networking space,” said Brian Livingston, editorial director of WindowsSecrets.com. “Sharing with perfect strangers private communications that are intended for a small group is not only ethically questionable but opens the door for legal concerns as well, given that posts and messages intended for a very limited number of people are being displayed for the whole world to see.”

Click here to read the entire story and Microsoft’s response.

Published since 2003, the Windows Secrets Newsletter reveals tricks and workarounds to get the most out of Microsoft Windows. Employing six full-time staff members, WindowsSecrets.com publishes the work of several contributing editors including Fred Langa, Ryan Russell, and Susan Bradley. For more information, visit the WS Lounge at Lounge.WindowsSecrets.com or the newsletter’s home page at WindowsSecrets.com.

[Photo above by Subterranean Tourist Board / CC BY-ND 2.0]

[awsbullet:electronic frontier foundation]

Milan Judge Finds Three Google Executives Guilty Of Violating Italian Privacy Laws

A Milan judge has found three Google executives guilty of violating Italian privacy laws. The judge also noted that it was his opinion the violations by the Google three were for monetary gains. The case involves a video of  Turin youths who were tormenting a mentally handicapped student at their school. The complaint was that Google did not do enough to stop the video from being shown, which the judge stated violated Italian privacy laws.

In a recent article it also stated that:

The convictions of Google Chief Legal Officer David Drummond, Global Privacy Counselor Peter Fleischer and former Chief Financial Officer George Reyes caused widespread controversy and were condemned by many observers as a threat to the freedom of expression on the Internet. The three were all acquitted on a second charge of defamation, as was their colleague, former head of Google Video Europe Arvind Desikan, who was not charged with the privacy violation.

Judge Magi stressed that the executives bore responsibility for the failure of oversight because at least part of the data-handling took place outside of Italy, “in particular in the United States, the place where the servers belonging to Google Inc. are undoubtedly located.”

His Milan court had jurisdiction, however, Magi argued, because “Google Italy handled the content that was uploaded to the Google Video platform and therefore bore responsibility for it at least in so far as the [Italian] privacy law is concerned.”

The judge criticized the information made available by Google on its own privacy rules as “totally inadequate or in any case so buried in the general conditions of the contract as to appear completely ineffective as far as the requirements of the law are concerned.”

I am sure that this court decision is going to raise some eyebrows for several reasons. First, in a day and age when posting of comments, articles, pictures, and video are virtually uncontrolled, who is really responsible — the poster[s], or the Web site that allows the posting to be made? In this case, Google removed the content once it was brought to its attention. Second, who controls the Internet? One country? Several countries? Every country in the world?

This has always been one of the benefits of the Internet. There is no legislative control by any lone government. So will this decision change things? I seriously doubt it.

What do you think?

Comments welcome.

Source

Google Buzz Gets A Privacy Reset

Well it’s about time, Google. Finally, it looks like Google is taking our privacy seriously with some badly needed changes to Google Buzz and give users what they should have had all along. Control over their privacy.

Now this is not going to undo the damage to privacy that was done in the first place, as these Buzz changes are a bit late really. But you know something, I guess it’s better late than never.

I remain of the mindset that Google Buzz should have NEVER been integrated with Gmail and the user given no real option in the matter. It’s mistakes like this, that lead to people not using products. Food for thought, Google.

Should Doctors Do A Google To Learn More About Their Patients?

Privacy concerns are becoming a hot topic for those who feel that our lives are becoming more open to others via a Google search. Now another topic is coming to light about doctor’s who may be doing a Google of their patients. The debate is raging on whether this is truly a violation of a patients right to privacy or whether the information is a part of the public domain.

In a recent essay by the Harvard Review of Psychiatry the authors stated that:

In some cases, what the authors call “patient-targeted Googling” is clearly beneficial — for example, when a patient is blogging about her suicidal thinking, or when an unconscious person comes into an emergency room with scant identification. But in other cases, the authors write, doctors are motivated by “curiosity, voyeurism and habit.”

“Most patients would probably be shocked that their doctor had the time or the interest to conduct a search like this,” one of the authors, David Brendel, said in an interview. “A good number of people would feel like their privacy had been breached, although a number might be happy the doctor was thinking about them outside of the 15 minutes or 30 minutes they were actually spending together.”

Though there are currently no ethical guidelines for doctors Googling their patients, some feel that it is an invasion of patients right to privacy. On the flip side there are those who feel it has beneficial aspects that could help a doctor.

Which makes one wonder? If we post something personal on the Internet should we expect it to remain private when it is available for all to see?

Wouldn’t it make sense that if you have something you wish to keep private that you would not post it on the Internet? Just my two cents.

Comments as always are welcome.

Source

Are You Breaking The Law With Your PC?

It’s something that no self-respecting person would ever think of as being an issue, yet as it turns out more people than I had expected likely fall into some of the categories listed in this article. Some of the stickier issues, and often easy to overlook, are laws surrounding the access to wireless networks (among a few others). Anyone thinking they are okay might want to ask themselves this question: Did you back up that DVD you own? You might be violating one of these legal issues. Perhaps you checked your email really quick on the nearest open Wi-Fi access point? Again, it’s easy to overlook, but there is a good chance that you are breaking some local statute or worse.

Other legal factors featured in the above linked article are pretty obvious. Don’t do anything sleazy, don’t steal, and don’t profit off of other people’s protected work. Seems fairly simple to me. But because illegal acts can also take place due to malware being used to exploit the PCs of others, etc., clearly it is a good idea to be darn sure you are using both an up to date anti-virus and a good firewall… just to be sure.

Here’s the lesson to take away. When in doubt about something, check. If your friend offers to install software you did not pay for, be wary if it’s proprietary and the license is unknown. Stay away from P2P networks and most of all… be careful when mooching Wi-Fi. This alone is still a dangerous gray area that can lead to criminal wiretap law issues if you are not careful. Use your heads out there; let common sense be your guide.

[awsbullet:Hacking Wireless Networks For Dummies]

Blocking Farmville And Other Facebook Irritants

Q: How do I block all the Farmville posts from my friends that are clogging up my Facebook page? I don’t have any interest in playing those games. — Lynn

A: Facebook has become an Internet phenomenon and a primary method of daily communication for millions of people. It’s become an amazing one-to-one-to-many communication system that continues to grow in popularity.

Of the 400 million people that have a Facebook account, over 83 million are active users of Farmville which is why even if you don’t play the game, you’re going to get pelted with updates from your friends.

What many users of third-party Facebook applications (such as Farmville, Café World, and Mafia Wars) don’t realize is that they are giving up their profile information in exchange for access to the game.

And they aren’t just giving up access of their profile info to the Farmville game maker, but also to all of their advertising ‘affiliates.’

Depending upon how your privacy settings are configured, your game playing friends can even allow these third-party companies to access your profile info even if you aren’t playing the game.

Facebook constantly updates its system (much to the dismay of many) but the upside is that they continue to add tools that help us manage the traffic and our privacy on our own pages.

If you simply want to hide Farmville posts from your ‘News Feed’ (generally the default page when you sign on to Facebook), the next time you get a Farmville update in your stream, float your mouse over the right corn of the post and click on ‘Hide.’

This should bring up three options: Hide (Username), Hide Farmville, and Cancel.

If you click on ‘Hide (Username),’ then nothing from that use will ever appear in your News Stream (but they can still manually post comments on your wall).

If you click on ‘Hide Farmville,’ you will not see any updates from this user or any other user that is playing Farmville in your News Feeds any longer. (This works with any posting that comes from third-party applications; Causes, Birthday Cards, etc.)

Additionally, If you want to globally block Farmville as an application to your profile so that you no longer get Farmville invitations, go to www.facebook.com/farmville and click on the ‘Block Application’ link below the Farmville logo on the left side.

You can repeat this for any Facebook application by simply putting the name of the app in the Search bar and finding the page associated with the application.

Most of your friends probably don’t realize that they can share your profile information to third-party applications even if you are not using the application or the game.

You can control what they can share about you by clicking on Account (in the upper right hand corner), then on Privacy Settings/Applications and Web sites then on the Edit Setting button for ‘What your friends can share about you.’

Remove the checkmark for any of your profile information that you do not want shared via your friends to applications and Web sites, but remember that anything that is available via your public profile can be readily accessed by third party applications and Web sites at any time.

If you want to see what information is available via your public profile, go back to the Privacy Settings screen, then click on Profile Information. You will see a list of items that are contained in your profile with buttons to the right with four options: Everyone, Friends of Friends, Only Friends, and Customize.

The first three are pretty obvious, but the Customize option allows you to choose one of the three previous settings and then manually hide the item from specific people.

Finally, be sure to click on the Preview My Profile button at the top right to double-check what the general Facebook public (and third-party applications) can see on your profile without being your friend first.

Ken Colburn
Data Doctors Computer Services
Data Doctors Data Recovery Labs
Data Doctors Franchise Systems, Inc.
Weekly video tech contributor to CNN.com
Host of the award-winning “Computer Corner” radio show

Privacy In Plain Sight

There should be an image here!Your computer most likely holds the necessary data sufficient for successful identity theft. All that is needed for identity theft to occur is to tie a social security number to a name. If you access sites like PayPal or your bank account, those personal data become readily available. Having your identity compromised is simply a personal nightmare that can take years to resolve.

The data on identity theft show that, many times, the crime is perpetrated by someone that the victim knows. That means that it is critical to protect your computer files from people that you know. It might be a roommate, a repair person, a classmate, a co-worker… someone who may and can have casual access to your desktop, laptop, and/or netbook.

In addition to that personal data, you might want to keep photos, passwords, music, videos, and other such files away from other prying eyes. These files represent your privacy.

We recommend Invisible Secrets for a number of security and privacy reasons:

“… Invisible Secrets 4 not only encrypts your data and files for safe keeping or for secure transfer across the net, it also hides them in places that on the surface appear totally innocent, such as picture or sound files, or Web pages. These types of files are a perfect disguise for sensitive information. Using our file encryption software nobody, not even your wife, boss, or a hacker would realize that your important papers or letters are stored in your last holiday pictures, or that you use your personal Web page to exchange messages or secret documents. With Invisible Secrets 4 file encryption software, you may encrypt and hide files directly from Windows Explorer, and then automatically transfer them by email or via the Internet.”

We have Invisible Secrets available to our readers at a 40% discount from this link.

Invisible Secrets works on Windows NT / 2000 /,P / Vista and Windows 7. This generous offer ends March 10, 2010.

Cisco Systems uses this program. The Drug Enforcement Administration (USA) uses this program. The Exchange Bank uses this program. McCain Foods Limited uses this program. The program is Invisible Secrets and the client list grows. Privacy and security are important to these companies and institutions — it is essential to computer protection. This is a preventative measure that individual computer users have to recognize because there is so much information on just one hard drive.

This program should be standard on every machine. With business laptops, government laptops, and personal laptops going missing every day, this security program should be on every portable machine, as well as desktop. This would provide an enormous saving for sensitive information that is breached and the subsequent nightmare of paying for identity theft protection. It’s simple and it’s effective.

Let’s look at just one feature of this program. There are situations where you might be concerned that about keylogging programs stealing your keyboard entries. For example, you might be using an unfamiliar Wi-Fi connection. Invisible Secrets provides a virtual keyboard that prevents criminal access to what you type. This safeguards your passwords and access to sites like PayPal. This is only one of the many benefits of this program.

And this is something that travelers might consider: what if airport security confiscated your laptop? It is absolutely frightening, but it can happen.

If you are in need of multiples of this program, please let us know. We will try to negotiate a good price for those companies that might need many copies for laptops holding those confidential files. For the individual user, think of the files, emails, pictures, passwords, and other bits of information that you don’t want people to access. That is exactly why we want this privacy/security program for our readers… and our thanks to the Invisible Secrets people for this kind offer.