Basic And Dynamic Disks In Vista (Part IV)

It is common these days for someone to move a hard disk between two computers. When you move a dynamic disk from one computer to another, the status will appear as “foreign” within the Disk Management console. You will be unable to access any data on the disk until you import the disk into the computer’s system configuration.

If you have moved a dynamic disk from one computer to another, you can use the steps below to import it. The steps below assume that you have already physically added the foreign disk to the computer.

  1. Click Start, right click Computer and click Manager.
  2. Click Storage
  3. Click Disk Management.
  4. From the Action menu, click Rescan Disks.
  5. Right click the disk marked as Foreign and click Import Foreign Disks.
  6. Follow the onscreen instructions to complete the process.

You should now be able to access the data that is stored on the new disk. The important point to remember any time you remove or add a physical type to a computer is that you have to open the Disk Management console and select the Rescan Disks option from the Action menu. And on that note, you should now be able to tackle many disk management tasks.

[tags]vista, basic disk, dynamic disk, windows, microsoft, partition, volume, drive[/tags]

Basic And Dynamic Disks In Vista (Part III)

Now that you are familiar with basic and dynamic disks, you can move on to performing some basic disk management tasks such as creating, shrinking, extending and formatting simple volumes.

In Vista, you can create a new simple volume by completing the steps below:

  1. Open Disk Management.
  2. Right click unallocated space on the dynamic disk and click New Simple Volume.
  3. Click Next.
  4. Type in the size of the volume and click Next.
  5. Assign a drive letter to the volume and click Next.
  6. Specify the formatting options. If you choose to format the partition, type in a name for the volume in the Volume Label field and select the file system you want to use.
  7. Click Next.
  8. Review your selections and click Finish.

New in Vista is the ability to shrink a volume. This means you can reclaim unused space from a volume and then create a new volume from that free space.

To shrink a volume:

  1. Open Disk Management.
  2. Right click the volume you want to shrink and click Shrink Volume from the context menu.
  3. Enter the amount in MB to shrink the partition.
  4. Click Shrink.

Once the operation is complete, the free space that you reclaimed will appear as unallocated space within Disk Management.

As with XP, Vista also lets you extend a volume.

To extend a simple volume:

  1. Within the Disk Management console, right click the simple volume that you want to extend and click Extend Volume.
  2. Select the disk that the volume will be extended to and click Add.
  3. Specify the amount of space to add to the volume. Click Next.
  4. Click Finish.

In the final installment of this article, I’ll outline some of the additional disk management tasks that you can perform in Vista.

[tags]vista, basic disk, dynamic disk, windows, microsoft, partition, volume, drive[/tags]

Basic And Dynamic Disks In Vista (Part II)

Vista supports both basic and dynamic disks (as does Windows 2000 and XP). You can use the Disk Management console to convert a basic disk to dynamic. Before you attempt to make the conversion, you need to keep the following points in mind:

  • You cannot revert to a basic disk without first deleting all partitions and volumes.
  • Vista Home editions do not support dynamic disks.
  • Portable computer do not support dynamic disks.

You can convert a basic disk to a dynamic disk by completing the steps below:

  1. Click Start, right click Computer and click Manager.
  2. Type mmc and click OK.
  3. Click Storage.
  4. Click Disk Management.
  5. In the right pane, right-click the disk you want to convert and click Convert to Dynamic Disk.

Alternatively, you can also use the ‘convert dynamic’ command from the Command Prompt.

Unfortunately converting back to a basic disk is not as simple but you need know the general process that has to be completed. Your very first step will be to back up data on the volumes. You can then use the ‘convert basic’ command from the command prompt to return the disk to a basic disk.

The next installment of this article will look at configuring dynamic disks under Vista.

[tags]vista, basic disk, dynamic disk, windows, microsoft, partition, volume, drive[/tags]

Basic And Dynamic Disks In Vista (Part I)

All versions of Windows support basic disks. A basic disk supports the following:

  • Primary partitions
  • Extended partitions
  • Logical drives

A basic disk also supports different types of Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) including volume sets, stripe sets, mirror sets, and stripe sets with parity.

Vista Business, Enterprise and Ultimate editions all support Dynamic Disks. A dynamic disk supports the following:

  • Simple volumes
  • Spanned volumes
  • Mirrored volumes
  • Striped volumes
  • RAID-5 volumes

You can upgrade a basic disk to dynamic disk using the Disk Management console. Click Start, right click Computer and click Manage. Click Storage and click Disk Management. Click Disk Management. Right click the appropriate disk and click Convert to Dynamic Disk.

There are things you need to keep in mind when converting to a dynamic disk. In order to revert to a basic disk, you must back up all your data, delete the existing volumes and repartition the disk. You can then convert to a basic disk using the ‘convert basic’ command.

Next, you cannot upgrade to a dynamic disk of you are using a mobile computer. Finally, dynamic disks are not accessible under pre-Windows 2000 operating systems. If you are dual booting with an older version of Windows, the dynamic disk will not be readable.

In the next installment of this article, I will more closely at converting from a basic to dynamic disk.

[tags]vista, basic disk, dynamic disk, windows, microsoft, partition, volume, drive[/tags]

VolumeTouch v1.1

With the many different computer setups we have out there in the world today, there are many different ways of controlling your speaker volume. You could use the built-in tools Windows provides. You could use an external volume knob. If you have the freeware program, VolumeTouch, you could do it a number of other ways, as well.
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Potential File Corruption On NTFS Volumes In Server 2003 SP1

Microsoft knows about a potential file corruption problem on NTFS file system volumes in Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 (SP1). This problem may occur during extensive stress test scenarios on the storage stack. Microsoft regularly runs stress tests on the NTFS storage stack. These stress tests include scenarios that are very far outside the bounds of what is likely to occur in real-world usage. We understand that our customers might question whether they can currently deploy Windows Server 2003 SP1 or whether they should wait for a hotfix to be available. Although we cannot answer this question with 100 percent certainty, the following guidelines can help customers assess the effect on their environments when customers deploy Windows Server 2003 SP1.

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