Yahoo! Axis Browser Reviewed

Just when you thought that Yahoo! was down for the count, the company surprises us with a new browser. Even more surprising is that its browser, called Axis, is currently only available for the Apple iPhone, iPad, and iPod. However, it is marketing extensions and add-ons for other popular browsers such as Firefox, Explorer, Chrome, and Safari.

In order to test this new browser, I downloaded and installed it onto my Apple iPad system. Now I would like to report my findings, observations, likes, and dislikes of Yahoo!’s first attempt at entering the browser wars. To give even further depth to my findings I had my wife, a big Safari fan, use the new browser over the Memorial Day weekend. Her thoughts and opinions will be included in my report.

When first coming upon this new browser from Yahoo!, I couldn’t help but wonder why Apple would even allow a third-party application on any of its devices. Could it be that it is looking for something to replace Safari? This concept may not be too far off since Apple has always been very territorial and protective when it comes to its software. This has included not allowing any third-party applications to circumvent the controls that it has built in to prevent hacking or tampering with its precious iOS. To me, this took on an even stranger aspect when one considers that Microsoft has its pinkies into Yahoo!. Could this mean that these two computer giants are considering working together? Far be it for me to know the answer, but it does appear that this is something that appears in the realm of possibility. I wonder if it is just me who feels this way, or do others in our community share this thought? Comments are welcome.

So moving on, I installed Yahoo! Axis and proceeded to take it for a test spin. I must admit, however, since I really like my Chrome browser, I wasn’t expecting much from this latest entry into the marketplace — but I was pleasantly surprised.

Over all, it was quite obvious that Yahoo! had done its homework in creating a browser that not only worked well but had been fine-tuned for mobile devices. The browser is both intuitive and responds quickly to commands. Additionally, I found that it provides an easy-to-use GUI that is a pleasure to use. In fact, it may seem somewhat familiar to anyone who has previously used the Pulse app since, as you can see below, its presentation is similar.

Yahoo! Axis Browser ReviewedWhen first approaching the GUI, my thoughts were:

  • That it appeared as if it would be slick and easy to use.
  • Why didn’t Google think of this?
  • This is not a good browser; it is a great browser.

I know that, given this review, one might think that Yahoo! has paid me a huge sum of money to rant and rave about how wonderful Axis is. That isn’t happening since Yahoo! most likely won’t even know that I wrote this article. It is just that, for the vast majority of us who have been surfing the Internet over the last decade or so, we really haven’t seen any major improvement in browsers. In fact, given the vast array of browsers out there, most of us would admit that the differences are so minor that the programs appear to be merely clones of one another. This fact becomes even more evident when it comes to mobile browsers, which can leave the user feeling frustrated with their rendering of websites that makes navigation through them nothing but a chore.

With this new browser, however, both my wife and I found that searching for a term or a news heading will display results in a preview window (similar to how Pulse presents the information). However, what further impressed me was the fact that the search results contained not just typical, everyday sites, but sites that I had never heard of. Not only did I find this amazing, but I was surprised to be given access to this large array of available sites so quickly. These two performance factors are what make Axis stand out among other browsers, making it a great tool for those of us who need quick access to the Web on a regular basis. In addition, Axis has the ability to sync to your other mobile devices as well as your desktop browser, meaning that your information will be available to you wherever and whenever you need to access it.

Yahoo! Axis Browser ReviewedMy wife, on the other hand, is not as electronically intrigued as I am and is happy using the Safari browser with which she is familiar. She feels that Safari meets her needs and has no desire to start learning a new browser, no matter how simple it might be. In this, she has a very valid point. As she asked, “Why should I make a change if I am happy with what I have?” However, even if you are a loyal — but inquisitive — Apple fan, why not experiment and give the new Yahoo! Axis browser a try?

Of course, I don’t know how you will judge this new browser, but if you are like me and enjoy adventuring into the unknown, I would highly recommend you take the time to investigate what Yahoo!’s new Axis browser has to offer.

Note, however, that I did find one problem with the new browser that occurred when I attempted to use it as an extension for Google’s Chrome browser. In this case, I discovered that the new Axis browser became quite cumbersome and unnecessary. Of course. these are just my two cents’ worth and I would welcome your feedback.

Comments welcome.

Source: Yahoo!

CC licensed Flickr photo at the top of the page shared by bertboerland

Will Google’s Chrome Browser Ad Campaign Make You Switch?

In what I can only describe as another unique Google promotion, the company is starting to advertise on the older medium of television. I spotted one of the Google advertisements last evening while watching television, when my wife brought the ad to my attention. Her question was: why would Google advertise on TV?

Google has been a driving force on the Internet since the company grabbed the lion’s share of search. One would think that Google should have little trouble getting the public to start using its Chrome Browser. However, one of the problems is trying to get the public’s attention focused on Chrome and away from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser.

So what other options does Google have to gain attention to its Chrome browser? Google could take the AOL approach and mail out millions of compact discs to every household in America. The scheme that AOL tried, I believe, was a failure, with consumers outraged at the AOL disks arriving week after week. I used the AOL discs to keep the birds away from our berries in the back yard. Most people just tossed them into the trash, adding more toxins to our trash dumps.

Google tried placing advertisements for its Chrome browser on the Internet, but apparently this hasn’t helped much. Chrome has been struggling to garner market share and is at about 18% with Internet Explorer at about 45%. Most people use Internet Explorer because it is the default Windows browser and they feel comfortable using it. Firefox remains the most popular alternative to IE. Many users may not feel there is a need to try something else.

Most people who read the articles here at LockerGnome are tech savvy and know that there are many alternatives to Internet Explorer. 21% of LockerGnome readers use Google Chrome as of this writing. Many people outside the tech industry have no clue that Google even makes a browser, or that they can download something else besides Internet Explorer. This, I believe, is where Google should concentrate its focus and enlighten those who don’t know about other alternatives.

So trying advertisements on television may be a great way to bring the brand to consumers’ attention. Google has the big bucks to give this a try and increase its browser market share.

Watch Google’s video; will it make you switch?

Comments welcome.

Mozilla Has Posted A List Of 50 Slow Performing Add-Ons For Firefox

I have used Firefox for about six years before making the switch over to Google Chrome. I made the switch not because I thought that Google Chrome was better than Firefox. I made the switch because one add-0n aka extension would not work properly in Firefox so I decided to switch.  So when I read an article directly from the Mozilla team, which lists 50 slow performing add-0ns, I thought to myself that it was about time that Mozilla put the slowness of Firefox on the actual culprits. It is surprising how many complain that for them, Firefox crawls, but they don’t mention how many add-ons they load up on the browser.

In another surprise, the 50 top slow performing add-0ns include some of the most popular ones like FasterFox, which actually claims to speed up the Firefox browser. But according to the folks at Mozilla, FasterFox can slow the browser as much as 32%. But there are other add-ons that can slow down your browsing experience by as much as 40%. Here is a listing of the top 10 that can slow your browser down:

#1 Firebug 74% slower
#2 FoxLingo 73% slower
#3 FoxClocks 46% slower
#4 FoxyTunes 44% slower
#5 Video DownloadHelper 35% slower
#6 FastestFox 32% slower
#7 Xmarks Sync 30% slower
#8 Similar Web 23% slower
#9 CoolPreviews 21% slower
#10 Adblock Plus 20% slower

Another thing that can slow down Firefox are what is called Flash cookies. The cookies are related to Adobe’s Flash and is used to store their data own data in your browser. What is also disturbing is that these Flash cookies are not dumped when you delete traditional cookies. One program I have seen advertised, but that I have not used is Kill Flash Cookies. The nice thing about the program is that it isn’t dependent on the browser.

One of the suggestions by the Mozilla developers are to uninstall add-ons that you no longer use or need. This is a great suggestions and may just help to bring speed back to your Firefox browser.

Comments welcome.

PS the additional 40 add-ons can be located at the link below.

Source – Mozilla

Hands-On With Firefox 4

Early Tuesday, Mozilla released Firefox 4. This is a full two years after the last major release of 3.5.

Since Firefox 3.5, things have changed, and we aren’t talking about small changes. No, the whole landscape of browsing has changed and Mozilla Firefox is here and showing off those new Web standards.

When Firefox first hit the market in 2000, it revolutionized the way people browse the Internet. Mozilla was the first of its kind to be open source and have a cleaner UI. Since the first release, Mozilla has brought innovative features like tabbed browsing and add-ons to an extent that hadn’t been seen before.

Sadly, over the last few years, users have shifted away from it. Most add-ons started to slow down the users’ systems and Firefox experienced periods where the program had a memory leak. Firefox was also using an outdated layout engine called Gecko, but with the introduction of WebKit, every other browser was using it; Firefox neglected to switch and started losing the browser market because of it.

This hugely important release from Mozilla fixes these problems. There hasn’t been an extensive beta test period of this version of Firefox; the developers have been very thorough and spent countless hours getting up to this final release.

User Interface

Mozilla 4 first hit the Internet back in 2009 when Mozilla released some screen shots of the new browser with the tabs on top of the application. The minimalist design is exactly what users want in a browser and Mozilla seems to have built upon that common thought in browsers.

Tabs are a nice size and don’t blur the line between the tabs and top of the application so users won’t drag a tab instead of dragging the window. Cycling between tabs within Firefox has gotten even easier.

Mozilla has even done something radical and changed the location of the home button to the very right hand side of the address bar. The minimalist design can be built upon and the bookmarks bar can be expanded to its own line for the users who use bookmarks frequently. All components can be customized simply by right clicking on the area and choosing “customize.”

Firefox has even done some innovating and created what it calls Panorama, which is a way to group tabs. It creates different groups of tabs and lets you switch easily between them. Power users will find great use of the new grouping system while others who might not care for it can just ignore it.

Speed

It used to be commonly known that Mozilla Firefox was the fastest browser on the Web. But that was back during Firefox 3. Over the years it has become bloated and slowed down significantly. Since earlier releases, other browser makers have opted for a more powerful JavaScript engine and focused less on the rendering engine.

With Firefox 4, Mozilla claims it to be six times faster than its predecessor. It does have some amazing speed improvements and pages are loading faster than ever compared between Firefox 3.5 and Firefox 4. Compared to Chrome, they both launch in about the same time and load pages just as fast.

Add-ons

Within this new release Firefox gets a totally redesigned add-on system. Add-on installation and browsing now takes place in its own full browser window, rather than a pop-up screen. This is not only easier on the eyes but makes reading, finding, installing, and removing add-ons a breeze.

Most of the major mainstream add-ons are compatible with Firefox 4. Users may run into an add-on or two that are incompatible. But add-on developers seem to be on the ball with this new update. Since this is a new browser, give developers a week or two to make their add-ons compatible. If your favorite add-on isn’t updated in the next week or two, it might be time to look for a replacement — it probably indicates developer abandonment.

Since the release of this major version, Firefox will be pushing for lighter weight extensions, like those for Google Chrome. These add-ons are usually built using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript and tend to use less resources on the browser.

Add-ons have been Firefox’s best strength in the browser market but it has also been its weakness. The impact of most of these add-ons have affected performance of the browser, which seems to slow down with each new add-on installed. It is safe to say that not all of Firefox’s downfalls come from the quality of the add-ons available for it.

It is tough to find the line between utility and performance: users want to try every new add-on under the sun and the cost of doing so tends to cast a bad image when the users’ computers and browsers start to crash. But from what I understand about the Firefox add-on APIs and toolkits, it is an area Mozilla has spent a lot of time working to make better; with the new API and add-on options, the browser might make a huge come back.

Conclusion

With the massive changes of Firefox 4, old users might come back and existing users can take a deep breath and start anew. My personal answer is mixed; at home I will continue to use Google Chrome, but when I am traveling and not at my work or home computer I will keep Firefox close to me on a USB drive. I will keep Firefox 4 on my computer for those off chances that Google Chrome crashes.

The new UI is exciting and a great relief from past versions of Firefox. Its new feature, Panorama, is something I could potentially use and the performance improvements are remarkable.

Firefox users are gonna love this. Developers are gonna be overjoyed with having this on their computers. And the obsessive compulsive clean freaks will be pleased with this simple layout.

As far as competition goes, Firefox is getting up there. Like Google Chrome and Safari before it, they have these cleaner interfaces and smooth browsing experience.

How to Capture a Web Page as an Image

Having the ability to capture a web page as an image is vital for tech bloggers, IT professionals, video podcasters, and web developers. Being able to capture the entire page instead of just a visible portion requires some additional help not available in most browsers by default. Below are some tools and suggestions that can help you achieve your goal.

Capturing Web Pages in Firefox:
Firefox has an overwhelming number of plug-ins and add-ons that allow this functionality. Below are a few that the community have taken a liking to. Keep in mind this isn’t an all-inclusive list.

Screengrab captures pages either in their entirety or just what you can see in the current Firefox window. It captures mostly everything you can see in Firefox including flash components.

Abduction! adds a right click option to take screenshots of an entire web page or just part of a web page to save as an image.

FireShot boasts the most forward thinking compatibility being compatible up to 4.0b9pre. That’s not to say others aren’t either heading in that direction or already there. Unlike other extensions, this plugin provides a set of editing and annotation tools, which let users quickly modify web captures and insert text annotations and graphical annotations. Such functionality will be especially useful for web designers, testers and content reviewers.

Capturing Web Pages in Chrome:
Webpage Screenshot, is it’s called, does exactly that. It takes a picture of either part of a page or the whole thing and sends you to a built-in editor that allows you to add annotations and small edits before saving it or sending it to a free hosting service. This is one of the more robust page capturing tools I tested doing research for this article.

Capturing Web Pages in Windows:
IECapt is an open-source solution that captures images of pages rendered using the Internet Explorer engine. This is a pretty standard image capture program and it works for a variety of site styles out there. If it loads in default IE, it will capture in IECapt.

Capturing Web Pages in OS X:
Paparazzi! is a free stand-alone program that allows you to capture an entire web page as an image file. It has a simple interface that asks for the URL you wish to capture and size requirements. You can set a minimum and maximum capture area or let it capture a page in its entirety and tell you the results.

Paparazzi! is based on WebKit and Cocoa, and while it captures a lot of different web code bases, it doesn’t render anything that requires a plug-in such as Adobe Flash. This might also be a great way to test a site for compatibility across desktop and mobile browsers. As an example, Jquery and HTML5 resources pull up fine where Flash and Silverlight do not.

If you’ve ever found yourself in the need of capturing an entire web page in the form of an image file, Paparrazi! might be worth a look at. The failure to render embedded YouTube videos, scripted menus, etc. is a drawback, though at a price tag of free there isn’t much of a reason not to keep Paparazzi in mind when searching for a solution to this often nagging problem.

Are There Disadvantages to Using Google Chrome?

Someone in our live community recently asked what I feel the advantages – and disadvantages – are for using Google Chrome. We are talking about the web browser in this instance, not the operating system. Google Chrome is built upon the Chromium foundation, as are Flock and RockMelt.


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

One advantage of Chrome is that they are constantly releasing new versions. It’s not going to disappear into obscurity. Google’s entire business model IS “the Web.” They are going to do their best to continue to try and build the best browser possible. There’s seemingly always a new beta version available, proving further that they are evolving on a regular basis.

I honestly can’t come up with a disadvantage, unless someone doesn’t want statistics sent back to Google. There are occasional crashes, as well, but yeah – EVERY browser has that problem at times. Is there anything you can think of?

What are YOUR thoughts? Is Chrome a good choice – or not?

Does Mozilla F1 Change The Game?

Mozilla looks to be taking on a new role in the browser game. Instead of merely going on as it always has, this time it is trying something new by addressing a major problem its users have when they want to share links with one another. Enter a new Mozilla concept called F1. The idea is fairly straightforward: Mozilla’s F1 allows users to share the links they want with their friends, but without fear of using unknown sources with questionable practices. I mean, do you really want to give out your email address to that strange sharing tool? Probably not.

The message here seems fairly clear. Mozilla is working to make sharing on the Web easier. And this is honestly something that is long overdue. There are a number of ways to sync bookmarks, among other nice features, but I’m not entirely sure this is a brand new concept. Wasn’t Flock doing this like two years ago already? Obviously, I cannot speak to who is doing this link sharing in a safer manner and, in the end, both are using Mozilla code as their base… perhaps it doesn’t really matter at all?

For Firefox users, though, this is cool as it means that users will be able to put their trust in Mozilla-branded extensions and free themselves from using the unknown. Speaking for myself, I am old school. Copy and paste more than does the job and the best part is I don’t have to worry about some unusual exploit surrounding the tools accessing my social media pages and creating headaches. Call me a luddite when it comes to changing my browsing habits, but it has worked great for me so far.

Socialize Your Life With RockMelt

Today we can all rejoice, the first social browser designed around how you use the web is here.

RockMelt is a revolutionary browser that does more than let you navigate through websites. RockMelt allows users to “share and keep up with your friends, stay up-to-date on news and information, and search” by bringing all of your social media sites into this one browser.

This powerful browser is built on Chromium, which is the open source project behind Google’s Chrome browser. RockMelt is “built for how you use the Web” and not just how you browse the web.

Currently this browser has some kinks and bugs, but if you are willing to work through them you can sign up for early access, and you’ll get an invitation to this social browser.

For the power users of social media, this browser is a haven for you. Like to tweet and share links? The producers of RockMelt have built the features in so that you can share links directly in the browser. Like a site or story? Click the browsers “Share” button and there you go, automatically shared with your Facebook or Twitter followers.

Having built in features like this in a browser allows you to streamline your social media process. Taking out the clutter of using the sites share button or getting into a different application to tweet out what you want, this browser has it all built in for the pleasure of you.

It’s simple as point and share.

RockMelt is the first ever browser that you log into. Logging in unlocks  your powerful Web experience with your Facebook friends, your feeds, your favorite services, even your bookmarks and preferences.

What also makes RockMelt revolutionary is that it is the first browser to be fully backed by the cloud. This means that all of your information is in the cloud so you can use this browser anywhere you surf the internet.

RockMelt keeps track of all your favorite sites for you, alerting you when a new story comes out, a friend posts new pictures, or a new video is available. And when you open a RockMelt feed, the content is already waiting for you. You can Like, comment, reply, retweet, share – all the actions you’ve come to expect from each service you follow.

RockMelt even makes your search faster. With RockMelt architecture you can use your keyboard to flip through Google search results like a magazine and pick the one you want.

After two years of work, RockMelt is still in its infant stages. Be sure to sign up for early access and let the RockMelt team know what you think. Be sure to follow the Twitter account for their latest information.

Decrease The Load Time For Internet Explorer 8

There should be an image here!One of the most common complaints I hear from people using Internet Explorer is the slow load time. The culprit: add-ons preinstalled with a computer or ones that have been installed over time. Add-ons seriously impact your browser’s performance and drastically slow it down. So if you want to increase the load time of Internet Explorer, get rid of the unnecessary add-ons.

Internet Explorer 8 makes it simple to manage add-ons with the Manage Add-ons feature. Within Internet Explorer, click the Tools menu and select Manage Add-ons. The Manage Add-ons window appears listing all add-ons currently loaded.

To determine which add-on is causing the slow load time, check the load time for each add-on in the list. The load time is the average amount of time in seconds that an add-on takes to load and finish initializing. Every time Internet Explorer 8 starts or you open a new window, these add-ons are created and initialized. Once you identify which add-on is causing the problem, you can disable it from the Manage Add-ons window. Simply select the add-on and click the Disable button.

[Photo above by Dimitri N / CC BY-ND 2.0]

IE9 – Good But Not Perfect

I’ve been playing with a few releases of the Internet Explorer 9 beta. It’s not bad. It’s nothing to write home about, but at least I see Web sites being rendered properly for once, so that is a treat, I suppose.

Seems that that some article picked up on how an early release of IE9 handles what will become, HTML5. That’s great, but honestly, we’re a little early here. Facts are IE9 is just a beta quality browser still being developed. And HTML5 is still under heavy development. So wouldn’t it stand to reason that we need to give IE9 more time to become ready for prime time before coming to any judgments either way?

There are going to be plenty of browsing options available as both IE9 and HTML5 come to full maturity. Yes, IE9 is better than 7 and even 8, to a degree. But it’s nothing worth getting too excited over until we have a final product on both fronts to see in action. But this is just my take on the situation.

Anything Your Browser Can Do, Mine Can Do Better

Someone in the live chat room recently asked how they can convince a relative to stop using Internet Explorer. The answer is that you really can’t — and you shouldn’t. They use what they use because they like it. It’s a matter of personal preference, folks. How would you like it if someone told you you need to stop using Chrome, Firefox, or Safari? You’d not be a very happy camper.

If they aren’t happy and are looking for suggestions, then go ahead and give them your ideas. When you try to convince someone to change — whether it’s Web browsers or even religions — you’re superimposing your experiences onto them. You’re forcing your own opinions and perspectives on someone’s life.


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

If they’re using IE for all the wrong reasons (such as using a very old version), that’s a bad reason. Explain to them why it may not be safe. It may work well and look good to them, but it isn’t safe. Tell them the dangers, and help them understand why they should upgrade or look at a different browser.

If you are going to insist on trying to get someone to change, don’t simply say something is better or faster. You will never win them over. Point out specific features you feel they would appreciate and need that they cannot get in the browser they are using now. The same can hold true if you are talking about phones, gadgets, or computers.

Show them something they will be able to do outside of the limitations of what they have now. Ask them what they want their browser (or anything) to do, then show them what fits best with their needs — even if it is Internet Explorer.

Want to embed this video on your own site, blog, or forum? Use this code:

Increase The Load Time For Internet Explorer 8

There should be an image here!One of the most common complaints I hear from people using Internet Explorer is the slow load time. The culprit: add-ons preinstalled with a computer or ones that have been installed over time. Add-ons seriously impact your browser’s performance and drastically slow it down. So if you want to increase the load time of Internet Explorer, get rid of the unnecessary add-ons.

Internet Explorer 8 makes it simple to manage add-ons with the Manage Add-ons feature. Within Internet Explorer, click the Tools menu and select Manage Add-ons. The Manage Add-ons window appears listing all add-ons currently loaded.

To determine which add-on is causing the slow load time, check the load time for each add-on in the list. The load time is the average amount of time in seconds that an add-on takes to load and finish initializing. Every time Internet Explorer 8 starts or you open a new window, these add-ons are created and initialized. Once you identify which add-on is causing the problem, you can disable it from the Manage Add-ons window. Simply select the add-on and click the Disable button.

[Photo above by Dimitri N / CC BY-ND 2.0]

[rssbullet:http://coupons.lockergnome.com/cgi-bin/feed/rss-custom-feed.pl?search_method=search&stores=&category=&search_string=wine&search_coupon_titles=1&date=0&all_coupons_per_store=1]

Move The Temporary Internet Files Folder In Internet Explorer 8

There should be an image here!The purpose of the Temporary Internet Files folder is to speed up Internet browsing. By default Internet Explorer stores a user’s temporary internet files within a user profile typically located under C:Users or C:Documents and Settings. This folder can consume a significant amount of disk space so at some point you may want to move it to a drive with more space.

To move the Temporary Internet Files folder in Internet Explorer 8:

  1. Open Internet Explorer.
  2. Click Internet Options from the Tools menu.
  3. On the General tab, click the Settings button
  4. Click Move Folder.
  5. Select the new drive and folder and click OK.

[Photo above by Dimitri N / CC BY-ND 2.0]

[rssbullet:http://ah.pricegrabber.com/export_feeds.php?pid=hjehfab&document_type=rss&limit=25&topcat_id=all&category=topcat:all&col_description=1&form_keyword=pirate+booty]

Move The Temporary Internet Files Folder In Internet Explorer 8

There should be an image here!The purpose of the Temporary Internet Files folder is to speed up Internet browsing. By default Internet Explorer stores a user’s temporary internet files within a user profile typically located under C:Users or C:Documents and Settings. This folder can consume a significant amount of disk space so at some point you may want to move it to a drive with more space.

To move the Temporary Internet Files folder in Internet Explorer 8:

  1. Open Internet Explorer.
  2. Click Internet Options from the Tools menu.
  3. On the General tab, click the Settings button
  4. Click Move Folder.
  5. Select the new drive and folder and click OK.

[Photo above by Dimitri N / CC BY-ND 2.0]

Chrome Extension Store Coming

Do we really need to see a marketplace where people can buy Chrome browser extensions? Well, I guess it could work. Android’s marketplace has done fairly well. But will people be anxious to buy some extensions, even if most of them remain free? I tend to doubt it.

Now if we see Chrome embracing feature rich apps instead, well, this very well could be enough to get people willing to drop a buck or two on some cool applications. Apps that are able to sync data and further blur Web from local software could could do well in this space.

Now the real question is whether or not Google can take something like this, being first to market, and make it cool. Opera has bounded around this area for a few years now. However, its widget approach never really took off to a point where it changed the way we looking at software, either. So until Google rolls this out the door, it’s anyone’s guessing game.