Open Candy Advertising Software – Would You Want This On Your Computer?

There is a new kid in town, with a new advertising scheme, that you may run into when installing new software onto your computer system. The basic operation of Open Candy is to offer you the user, additional software downloads, when installing software onto your Windows-based system. When you install a new software program onto your system, the Open Candy advertising software, presents a screen in which you can either select to install additional software or ignore the installation if you wish.

The theory of this, according to the folks at Open Candy, is that this will allow consumers the opportunity to purchase other software from the developer of the program you are installing. This in itself sounds OK, except there is one minor issue with this type of software. The Open Candy software installs onto your computer to do a search so it can determine a listing of software that may be a best choice for you to use. In other words, Open Candy doesn’t want to recommend a software you may already have installed on your computer.

I took a stroll around the Internet, after doing a Google search for Open Candy, when I located an interesting piece on the Gizmo’s website. According to the folks at Gizmo’s, this is what happens whether you accept to install additional software or not to install additional software:

While you can elect not to download any of the programs suggested by OC you cannot opt out from installing OC itself; it is fully embedded in the installation process.

In addition to the above, additional information about your computer is allegedly sent back to the folks at Open Candy. Again, it is immaterial whether you accept to download the software or not, that Open Candy is offering. In their FAQ it seems that Open Candy does admit this.

To their credit Open Candy does provide information on how to uninstall their software and to remove any registry keys that may be left on your computer system.

I guess my question would be this. Do we need another advertising gimmick that scans our computers and sends back information to a companies servers?

I haven’t ran into the Open Candy software so I have no personal knowledge about it. If you have run into Open Candy during the installation process, would you please share your thoughts with us.

Source – Open Candy

What Is The Best Anti-Virus Program? Common Sense 2011

As many of you know, I have just recently switched from using AVG over to using avast!. The new AVG 2011 made my system sluggish and was bloated so I reluctantly made the switch. I have also advised many times never to rely on any one anti-virus program as your sole line of defense. I personally will use Malwarebytes, Spyware Terminator, or one of the fine online scanners listed below, to periodically scan my system for critters.

What brought this all to mind was a computer I worked on yesterday. It belongs to a relative and they were experiencing reboot problems. The computer was running an older copy of AVG 8.5 that I had installed when they bought the computer. Yesterday I ran Malwarebytes which found 42 viral infection which I placed into the vault. Uninstalled AVG 8.5 and installed avast! version 5, it also found two more bugs.

In addition to the two programs I have mentioned above, I also use online scanners about once a month. I rotate the scanners, never leaving it to any one system to find and eradicate any bugs that my system may pick up. The online scanners I recommend are:

TrendMicro Housecall

Panda ActiveScan

BitDefender QuickScan

F-Secure Online Scanner

There are others available, but I use these four, rotating them through the months. I have not had an infection on any computer I have every used for well over 10 years. The reason is simple. I have a secret weapon and it is the best anti-virus program in the world. It is called Common Sense 2011. :-)

By using my brain I stay away from areas of the Internet that pose a hazard. I never lurk where danger resides and confine myself to reputable Web sites only. I keep my eyes open for anything suspicious, use two separate scanners to warn about rogue sites, and basically confine my searching to where the good guys are. That, my friends, is why it is called Common Sense. The 2011 model will start on January 1st, 2011. It has worked flawlessly in the past and I have no doubt it will do the same in the future.

Comments welcome.

FileHippo Update Checker – Give It A Try

I installed and tried FileHippo Update Checker, and the software located 7 software products on my computer that were in need of upgrades. In addition FileHippo Update Checker found 3 other upgrades that were for beta software. FileHippo Update Checker is simple to use and it is free. Here is what they say on their web site:

What is it?
The Update Checker will scan your computer for installed software, check the versions and then send this information to FileHippo.com to see if there are any newer releases. These are then neatly displayed in your browser for you to download. Please note that not all programs are supported.

However, even though the program is limited, I still believe it is worth trying. The biggest benefit is that it does a good job plus it is free.

Comments welcome.

Source – FileHippo

New Version Of CCleaner Released

Version 3 of the popular program CCleaner has been released and is now ready of free download. The latest version now contains support for 64 bit systems. On the FileHippo sites CCleaner is described as:

CCleaner is a freeware system optimization, privacy and cleaning tool. It removes unused files from your system – allowing Windows to run faster and freeing up valuable hard disk space. It also cleans traces of your online activities such as your Internet history. Additionally it contains a fully featured registry cleaner. But the best part is that it’s fast (normally taking less than a second to run) and contains NO Spyware or Adware! :)

Cleans the following:

  • Internet Explorer
  • Firefox
  • Google Chrome
  • Opera
  • Safari
  • Windows – Recycle Bin, Recent Documents, Temporary files and Log files.
  • Registry cleaner
  • Third-party applications
  • 100% Spyware FREE
  • I have trusted CCleaner for many years and have always found it a very reliable program. As stated above, the program contains no spyware or adware and is still free. Give it a try. You will not be disappointed. I do recommend that the program should be used by experienced computer users. If you are not sure how to run the program, ask a friend or relative to assist you.

    Runs on Microsoft Windows 7, Vista, XP and 2000. Including both 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

    Comments welcome.

    Source – Free download CCleaner at FileHippo

    Malicous Mobile Apps

    There should be an image here!Q: A techie friend suggested that iPhone apps were safer than Android apps because Apple is so controlling of who can offer apps to iPhone users. Is this true? — Margaret

    A: It’s estimated that 50 billion apps per year will by downloaded by 2012 to more than 160 million smartphones, which is attractive to both commercial firms and malicious software developers.

    The explosion of mobile applications is happening so fast that issues of safety and security seem to be taking a back seat.

    A big contributor to this dearth of focus on security is confusion and lack of understanding of just what exposure a mobile app can be to private information.

    Your smartphone has a lot of very valuable data to marketers and those with malicious intent: location, call history, text messages, email, contacts, browsing history, your phone number, as well as your photos and what you have downloaded.

    Once an application is loaded on your smartphone, it can do whatever the programmer has instructed it to do, with or without your ongoing permission.

    With these two platforms (Google’s Android and Apple’s iOS), there are some significant differences in how apps are distributed and what users are told when they install the apps.

    Google’s Android platform is a more open system for app developers, so users don’t have to download all their apps from the Android Marketplace (iPhone users must download apps from Apple’s App store unless they circumvent the security — a.k.a. jailbreak the phone).

    The Android’s openness can be a benefit and a drawback depending upon how conscientious the user is when it comes to downloading apps.

    The benefit in openness is that, over time, more developers are apt to build apps for the Android platform because they know that they can get it to market without getting Google’s approval, which can lower the overall costs and eliminates the approval uncertainty.

    Right now, there are several hundred thousand apps for the iPhone and less than 100,000 for Android phones, but this gap is closing quickly.

    The ratio of free vs. pay apps for Android phones is 64% while only 28% of iPhone apps are free (keep in mind that malicious apps are more likely to be free to encourage more downloads).

    By design, Android apps alert the user during the install on what will be accessed on their phone by using the app and must get the user’s approval.

    The problem with this ‘disclosure’ process is that many users either don’t pay attention or don’t understand what is being disclosed during the install in their haste to use the app.

    Think like a hacker: one platform requires the submission for approval of every application (iPhone) and the other simply requires that you tell the user, in a somewhat technical manner, what will happen when the app is installed (Android) — but no one is confirming this.

    The reality as of this writing is that neither platform has experienced massive exposure to malicious applications, but you can be assured that this will change in the future.

    iPhone users that choose to ‘jailbreak’ their phones are essentially opening themselves to ‘un-vetted’ apps just like Android users, but they don’t get the disclosure step, so be forewarned.

    In my opinion, none of this should be the deciding factor on which platform to use as they are both wonderful systems that will continue to evolve with the changing environment.

    Just use the same rules as you should with your home computer: if you don’t need it, don’t install it and if you aren’t sure of the source, steer clear!

    Ken Colburn
    Data Doctors Computer Services
    Data Doctors Data Recovery Labs
    Data Doctors Franchise Systems, Inc.
    Weekly video tech contributor to CNN.com
    Host of the award-winning “Computer Corner” radio show

    BLADE Eliminates Drive-By Downloads From Malicious Web Sites

    Unsecured Web browsers and the growing number of complex applets and browser plug-in applications are allowing malicious software to spread faster than ever on the Internet. Some Web sites are installing malicious code, such as spyware, on computers without the user’s knowledge or consent.

    These so-called “drive-by downloads” signal a shift away from using spam and malicious email attachments to infect computers. Approximately 560,000 Web sites — and 5.5 million Web pages on those sites — were infected with malware during the fourth quarter of 2009.

    [kml_flashembed movie=”http://www.youtube.com/v/9emHejh8hWE” width=”350″ height=”288″ wmode=”transparent” /]

    A new tool that eliminates drive-by download threats has been developed by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and California-based SRI International. BLADE — short for Block All Drive-By Download Exploits — is browser-independent and designed to eliminate all drive-by malware installation threats. Details about BLADE will be presented today at the Association for Computing Machinery’s Conference on Computer and Communications Security.

    “By simply visiting a Web site, malware can be silently installed on a computer to steal a user’s identity and other personal information, launch denial-of-service attacks, or participate in botnet activity,” said Wenke Lee, a professor in the School of Computer Science in Georgia Tech’s College of Computing. “BLADE is an effective countermeasure against all forms of drive-by download malware installs because it is vulnerability and exploit agnostic.”

    The BLADE development team includes Lee, Georgia Tech graduate student Long Lu, and Vinod Yegneswaran and Phillip Porras from SRI International. Funding for the BLADE tool was provided by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Army Research Office and U.S. Office of Naval Research.

    The researchers evaluated the tool on multiple versions and configurations of Internet Explorer and Firefox. BLADE successfully blocked all drive-by malware installation attempts from the more than 1,900 malicious Web sites tested. The software produced no false positives and required minimal resources from the computer. Major antivirus software programs caught less than 30 percent of the more than 7,000 drive-by download attempts from the same Web sites.

    “BLADE monitors and analyzes everything that is downloaded to a user’s hard drive to cross-check whether the user authorized the computer to open, run or store the file on the hard drive. If the answer is no to these questions, BLADE stops the program from installing or running and removes it from the hard drive,” explained Lu.

    Because drive-by downloads bypass the prompts users typically receive when a browser is downloading an unsupported file type, BLADE tracks how users interact with their browsers to distinguish downloads that received user authorization from those that do not. To do this, the tool captures on-screen consent-to-download dialog boxes and tracks the user’s physical interactions with these windows. In addition, all downloads are saved to a secure zone on a user’s hard drive so that BLADE can assess the content and prevent any malicious software from executing.

    “Other research groups have tried to stop drive-by downloads, but they typically build a system that defends against a subset of the threats,” explained Lee. “We identified the one point that all drive-by downloads have to pass through — downloading and executing a file on the computer — and we decided to use that as our chokepoint to prevent the installs.”

    The BLADE testing showed that the applications most frequently targeted by drive-by download exploits included Adobe Reader, Sun Java and Adobe Flash — with Adobe Reader attracting almost three times as many attempts as the other programs. Computers using Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 6 became infected by more drive-by-downloads than those using versions 7 or 8, while Firefox 3 had a lower browser infection rate than all versions of Internet Explorer. Among the more than 1,900 active malicious Web sites tested, the Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States were the top three countries serving active drive-by download exploits.

    Legitimate Web addresses that should be allowed to download content to a user’s computer without explicit permission, such as a browser or plug-in auto-updates, can be easily white-listed by the user so that their functionality is not affected by BLADE.

    The researchers have also developed countermeasures so that malware publishers cannot circumvent BLADE by installing the malware outside the secure zone or executing it while it is being quarantined.

    While BLADE is highly successful in thwarting drive-by download attempts, the development team admits that BLADE will not prevent social engineering attacks. Internet users are still the weakest link in the security chain, they note.

    “BLADE requires a user’s browser to be configured to require explicit consent before executable files are downloaded, so if this option is disabled by the user, then BLADE will not be able to protect that user’s Web surfing activities,” added Lee.

    Abby Vogel Robinson @ Georgia Institute of Technology Research News

    [awsbullet:Malware Analyst]

    Can My Webcam Be Hacked?

    There should be an image here!Q: Can my webcam be hacked and turned on without me knowing? — Deborah

    A: After the recent high-profile case of the school that was accused of remotely spying on their students via the MacBooks that were issued to the students, a lot of misinformation and hype has been generated about “webcam spying.”

    The circumstances that allowed the school’s IT staff to remotely turn on the webcam has little in common with the average Internet connected computer that happens to have a webcam.

    The school had pre-loaded the computers with special software that would allow them to track and remotely access them in the event they were stolen or lost.

    By default, the average computer or laptop with a webcam is not vulnerable to this exploit just because it is connected to the Internet, so any rumors of this nature or untrue.

    What is possible, however, is that your computer can get compromised in a number of ways that would allow a specific remote user to access your webcam (or your entire computer for that matter).

    The two most likely scenarios are that someone with malicious intent gets their hands on your computer (and not for very long!) and secretly installs a special remote access program or you are tricked into allowing something to be installed via an email message, malicious Web site, instant message, or social network.

    The same ‘Trojan horse’ tactics used to infect computers with viruses and other malicious programs applies to this exploit by way of ‘social engineering’ tricks.

    For instance, a common tactic in the past was to send an email or instant message that said “I can’t believe you got caught on camera doing that!” with a link to the supposed video.

    When you clicked on the link, it would take you to a Web page that looked very much like a Facebook page with an embedded video. When you clicked on the video to watch it, you got a pop-up that said that you needed to update your ‘Flash Player’ software in order to view the video.

    And of course, conveniently located on the page was the official-looking Adobe Flash button that would allow you to get to this video that had you thoroughly concerned. When you clicked on the Adobe button, a program installation window popped up and when you told your computer to run this installation programm you just infected your computer.

    If you don’t keep your computer updated with the latest patches for your operating system and security programs, it’s even possible for your computer to get infected by simply visiting a malicious website (known as a ‘drive-by download’).

    Once these silent spy agents slip into your computer, the remote hacker can pretty much do whatever they want with your computer as if they were sitting in your home at your desk.

    To make things worse, once they get into your computer, they can disarm your security programs or sidestep detection because you told your computer to allow this program to be installed.

    A potential (but not absolute) indication that something or someone is accessing your webcam is when the webcam’s little LED indicator is on but you are not using your webcam in any program.

    If you are using a desktop system with a plug-in webcam, you may want to disconnect it until you can get a tech savvy person to look ‘under the hood’ of your computer to make sure you have not been compromised.

    If you have a laptop with a built-in webcam, you can try disabling it until you can get someone technical involved, but that can be equally as technical depending upon which operating system you are running (it’s different for just about every situation).

    The best way to avoid becoming a victim of this type of secret spy software is to avoid clicking on or downloading anything that you are not absolutely sure is safe. When in doubt, leave it out (and by rule you should doubt just about everything you encounter)!

    Ken Colburn
    Data Doctors Computer Services
    Data Doctors Data Recovery Labs
    Data Doctors Franchise Systems, Inc.
    Weekly video tech contributor to CNN.com
    Host of the award-winning “Computer Corner” radio show

    A WISE Way To Keep Malware At Bay

    There should be an image here!The numbers are staggering. Google suspects that Vietnamese Internet users have been attacked, in terms of “tens of thousands.” The focus is on the Vietnamese users today, but it could shift easily to attack other regions. That there are so many Internet users compromised in Vietnam is disturbing because, online, we are all connected.

    Google has had recent security issues. Today, there are reports that some journalists have had their email compromised; this is just a reminder that being online can be dangerous. There is no question that security programs are needed, and it is not only for your security — it is a matter of protecting yourself and other users online.

    Whenever you are online, there is the threat of hackers and cybercriminals compromising your computer. Imagine that your IP address is like a house along the information highway. Even if you do absolutely nothing while connected to the Internet, there are hackers “testing the doors” to see if it is possible to compromise your computer.

    One of the fallacies that we have been hearing is that some students believe that they are not at risk because, with their netbooks, they are only online briefly to check for email. Unfortunately, there is still a risk for just being online for a few minutes. It is a gamble with your computer security if there are not protection programs safeguarding your machine.

    There is organized activity out there working hard to compromise your computer. If it isn’t a government activity, it is hackers and cybercriminals involved in organized crime. Your machine holds personal information that can be sold for the purposes of identity theft. Your computer can be compromised to become part of a bot-network that spews spam. Unfortunately, this is just a reality of being online. It is the trade-off for having the convenience of the Internet. Many of us shop and pay bills online, and some criminal wants that personal information.

    These Internet crimes are often silent. It may take months, or sometimes even years, before a victim realizes that an identity has been compromised and exploited. We try to remind our readers that they have to make security a priority, and that is with every machine that is used to go online. It is just not enough to protect your main machine and say that information on your secondary machines does not matter. A malware infection on one machine can migrate to your other machine.

    We recommend security programs such as Webroot Internet Security Essentials (WISE):

    “…With unmatched antivirus, antispyware and firewall security, WISE provides blockbuster protection for your PC. In fact, the technologies in WISE have won a combined 11 PC Magazine Editors’ Choice awards! These technologies provide more complete protection than competing products to proactively block: viruses, spyware, worms, trojans, data theft, rootkits, hackers, intrusions, keyloggers…”

    Webroot is allowing up to three computers to be protected and with a ten dollar discount. This works out to be an amount of under seventeen dollars per computer. It is a huge bargain. Please use this link for the discounted price.

    Protect yourself with an award winning program. Protect all of the computers that you have (well, at least three of them). We want you to be safe online and just securing one machine is not enough. You do not want to be spreading malware when you synchronize your machines or share files between the machines. Webroot is a recognized leader in Internet security — when you do have this program, use it. You would be surprised by how many people who have security applications neglect to use them. That is just baffling!

    Gnomie Discount For Webroot Internet Security Essentials

    There should be an image here!The numbers are staggering. Google suspects that Vietnamese Internet users have been attacked, in terms of “tens of thousands.” The focus is on the Vietnamese users today, but it could shift easily to attack other regions. That there are so many Internet users compromised in Vietnam is disturbing because, online, we are all connected.

    Google has had recent security issues. Today, there are reports that some journalists have had their email compromised; this is just a reminder that being online can be dangerous. There is no question that security programs are needed, and it is not only for your security — it is a matter of protecting yourself and other users online.

    Whenever you are online, there is the threat of hackers and cybercriminals compromising your computer. Imagine that your IP address is like a house along the information highway. Even if you do absolutely nothing while connected to the Internet, there are hackers “testing the doors” to see if it is possible to compromise your computer.

    One of the fallacies that we have been hearing is that some students believe that they are not at risk because, with their netbooks, they are only online briefly to check for email. Unfortunately, there is still a risk for just being online for a few minutes. It is a gamble with your computer security if there are not protection programs safeguarding your machine.

    There is organized activity out there working hard to compromise your computer. If it isn’t a government activity, it is hackers and cybercriminals involved in organized crime. Your machine holds personal information that can be sold for the purposes of identity theft. Your computer can be compromised to become part of a bot-network that spews spam. Unfortunately, this is just a reality of being online. It is the trade-off for having the convenience of the Internet. Many of us shop and pay bills online, and some criminal wants that personal information.

    These Internet crimes are often silent. It may take months, or sometimes even years, before a victim realizes that an identity has been compromised and exploited. We try to remind our readers that they have to make security a priority, and that is with every machine that is used to go online. It is just not enough to protect your main machine and say that information on your secondary machines does not matter. A malware infection on one machine can migrate to your other machine.

    We recommend security programs such as Webroot Internet Security Essentials (WISE):

    “…With unmatched antivirus, antispyware and firewall security, WISE provides blockbuster protection for your PC. In fact, the technologies in WISE have won a combined 11 PC Magazine Editors’ Choice awards! These technologies provide more complete protection than competing products to proactively block: viruses, spyware, worms, trojans, data theft, rootkits, hackers, intrusions, keyloggers…”

    Webroot is allowing up to three computers to be protected and with a ten dollar discount. This works out to be an amount of under seventeen dollars per computer. It is a huge bargain. Please use this link for the discounted price.

    Protect yourself with an award winning program. Protect all of the computers that you have (well, at least three of them). We want you to be safe online and just securing one machine is not enough. You do not want to be spreading malware when you synchronize your machines or share files between the machines. Webroot is a recognized leader in Internet security — when you do have this program, use it. You would be surprised by how many people who have security applications neglect to use them. That is just baffling!

    Microsoft Recommends 5 Ways To Speed Up Your PC – But Do They Really Work?

    I just finished reading an article from Microsoft on five ways to speed up your PC. The tools involved in doing the maintenance process are those that are either built into Windows or that must be added to perform the five recommended functions. I am currently writing this on my wife’s PC, since I am running one of the recommend procedures — an error checking utility — on my computer. I have not run this process before and it is taking well over an hour and counting to check the integrity of my files. Needless to say this is soooooooooo… slowwwwwwwww…

    The Microsoft article article recommends running the following processes:

    Disk Cleanup

    Disk Defragmenter

    Error Checking Utility

    A Spyware Program

    Ready Boost

    I have always run third party utilities to do many of the functions described above. I like CCleaner or Glary Utilities to get the gunk out of my registry and temp files, Auslogic or Smart Defrag for disk defragmentation, and other free programs. I also use or recommend AVG or avast! and do use Ready Boost, but I am not sure exactly how well it works or doesn’t work.

    I am interested in your opinions of what you use to keep Windows running on your system and why. Do you feel that the tools that come with Windows are enough, or do you use third party software and why?

    Comments as always are welcome.

    Source – Microsoft

    The Lack Of Scruples Is Just Criminal

    There should be an image here!It is really despicable. There is no low to which hackers and criminals won’t stoop to deliver malware to you. As many of you know, recently there was a tragedy at the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Nodar Kumaritashvili, a luger from the former Soviet republic of Georgia, died in a crash in a training run. Criminals have used that incident to deliver malware through bogus tribute sites, news sites, videos, and so forth.

    These people have no scruples.

    During the Olympics, you may want to keep up with your favorite Olympic sport. That works to the hackers’ advantage. You may want to follow a news item of some recent political story. That works to the hackers’ advantage. Whatever generates traffic, these criminals will take advantage of the opportunity.

    We want our readers to protect themselves. This malware junk is intended to ambush people online. It does not matter where you go now online. Simply being online is a danger and security precautions should be taken. And every machine that you use should be protected.

    Every machine that you use to go online, no matter how briefly, has to be protected. Even if you have a machine that you do not put online, it should be protected. You may sync your other computers to this machine that you keep offline and some malware may slip onto your system. Because we strongly recommend protecting all your machines, we recommend the award winning security offered by Spyware Doctor:

    Spyware Doctor with AntiVirus is a top-rated malware, spyware & virus removal utility that detects, removes and protects your PC from thousands of potential spyware, adware, trojans, viruses, keyloggers, spybots and tracking threats.” It has won numerous awards and Spyware Doctor is good for “Microsoft Windows 7 (32bit, 64bit), Windows Vista SP1+ (32bit, 64bit), Windows XP SP2+ (32bit).”

    This is one of the premier, well recognized security programs, and PC Tools is allowing three computers to be protected under one license. That means that, for under seventeen dollars each, three computers can be protected from viruses, spyware, malware, and other security threats.

    Spyware Doctor can be purchased with a Gnomie discount here.

    Remember: When you use Spyware Doctor, update the security definitions regularly. It is doubtful that malware will decrease any time soon, and security measures are absolutely necessary — unfortunately.

    Delivering Malware To You By Any Means

    There should be an image here!It is really despicable. There is no low to which hackers and criminals won’t stoop to deliver malware to you. As many of you know, recently there was a tragedy at the Vancouver Winter Olympics. Nodar Kumaritashvili, a luger from the former Soviet republic of Georgia, died in a crash in a training run. Criminals have used that incident to deliver malware through bogus tribute sites, news sites, videos, and so forth.

    These people have no scruples.

    During the Olympics, you may want to keep up with your favorite Olympic sport. That works to the hackers’ advantage. You may want to follow a news item of some recent political story. That works to the hackers’ advantage. Whatever generates traffic, these criminals will take advantage of the opportunity.

    We want our readers to protect themselves. This malware junk is intended to ambush people online. It does not matter where you go now online. Simply being online is a danger and security precautions should be taken. And every machine that you use should be protected.

    Every machine that you use to go online, no matter how briefly, has to be protected. Even if you have a machine that you do not put online, it should be protected. You may sync your other computers to this machine that you keep offline and some malware may slip onto your system. Because we strongly recommend protecting all your machines, we recommend the award winning security offered by Spyware Doctor:

    Spyware Doctor with AntiVirus is a top-rated malware, spyware & virus removal utility that detects, removes and protects your PC from thousands of potential spyware, adware, trojans, viruses, keyloggers, spybots and tracking threats.” It has won numerous awards and Spyware Doctor is good for “Microsoft Windows 7 (32bit, 64bit), Windows Vista SP1+ (32bit, 64bit), Windows XP SP2+ (32bit).”

    This is one of the premier, well recognized security programs, and PC Tools is allowing three computers to be protected under one license. That means that, for under seventeen dollars each, three computers can be protected from viruses, spyware, malware, and other security threats.

    Spyware Doctor can be purchased with a Gnomie discount here.

    Remember: When you use Spyware Doctor, update the security definitions regularly. It is doubtful that malware will decrease any time soon, and security measures are absolutely necessary — unfortunately.

    A Word From The WISE

    Today, one security firm reported that there were about 5.5 million pages infected with malware in the last three months of 2009. Some of those pages were commonly visited sites: “In those three months, sites for Fox Sports, technology blog Gizmodo, and the Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids, Michigan, were exploited to deliver malware to unsuspecting visitors.”

    There was a commonly held belief that if you avoid “bad” sites and limit yourself to popular sites, then you would be safe from malware. Obviously, this is not the case. Hackers are becoming very sophisticated and they will go where they can find the most traffic to exploit. That means some very popular sites have been targeted and will be targeted in the future.

    It is no longer some teenager wanting to cause some problems and showing off for a limited number of friends. This is organized crime. These criminals want to exploit computers for identity theft, for spamming, for developing a bot network, and for other criminal intent.

    The dark side of the Internet is that everyone is a target, and we remind our readers to protect themselves and their personal information. These Internet crimes are silent; it may take months or years, for example, before you realize that your identity has been stolen and exploited. If you are online, you must pay attention to Internet security. That is why we recommend security programs such as Webroot Internet Security Essentials (WISE).

    “… With unmatched anti-virus, anti-spyware, and firewall security, WISE provides blockbuster protection for your PC. In fact, the technologies in WISE have won a combined 11 PC Magazine Editors’ Choice awards! These technologies provide more complete protection than competing products to proactively block: viruses, spyware, worms, trojans, data theft, rootkits, hackers, intrusions, keyloggers…”

    Webroot is allowing up to three computers to be protected and with a ten dollar discount. This works out to an amount under seventeen dollars per computer. It is a huge bargain.

    Protect yourself with an award-winning program. If you have more than one computer, you need to protect all of them. We want you to be safe online and just securing one machine is not enough. You do not want to be spreading malware when you synchronize your machines or share files between the machines.

    This Webroot offer would be an exceptional gift to any friend or family member who does not pay much attention to Internet security. This is an easy to use program that you can give for year round computer security. And remember, this offer allows you to protect three computers.

    Webroot Gnomie Discount

    Today, one security firm reported that there were about 5.5 million pages infected with malware in the last three months of 2009. Some of those pages were commonly visited sites: “In those three months, sites for Fox Sports, technology blog Gizmodo, and the Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids, Michigan, were exploited to deliver malware to unsuspecting visitors.”

    There was a commonly held belief that if you avoid “bad” sites and limit yourself to popular sites, then you would be safe from malware. Obviously, this is not the case. Hackers are becoming very sophisticated and they will go where they can find the most traffic to exploit. That means some very popular sites have been targeted and will be targeted in the future.

    It is no longer some teenager wanting to cause some problems and showing off for a limited number of friends. This is organized crime. These criminals want to exploit computers for identity theft, for spamming, for developing a bot network, and for other criminal intent.

    The dark side of the Internet is that everyone is a target, and we remind our readers to protect themselves and their personal information. These Internet crimes are silent; it may take months or years, for example, before you realize that your identity has been stolen and exploited. If you are online, you must pay attention to Internet security. That is why we recommend security programs such as Webroot Internet Security Essentials (WISE).

    “… With unmatched anti-virus, anti-spyware, and firewall security, WISE provides blockbuster protection for your PC. In fact, the technologies in WISE have won a combined 11 PC Magazine Editors’ Choice awards! These technologies provide more complete protection than competing products to proactively block: viruses, spyware, worms, trojans, data theft, rootkits, hackers, intrusions, keyloggers…”

    Webroot is allowing up to three computers to be protected and with a ten dollar discount. This works out to an amount under seventeen dollars per computer. It is a huge bargain.

    Protect yourself with an award-winning program. If you have more than one computer, you need to protect all of them. We want you to be safe online and just securing one machine is not enough. You do not want to be spreading malware when you synchronize your machines or share files between the machines.

    This Webroot offer would be an exceptional gift to any friend or family member who does not pay much attention to Internet security. This is an easy to use program that you can give for year round computer security. And remember, this offer allows you to protect three computers.

    A SUPERAntiSpyware Deal For Gnomies (Until January 20th, 2010)

    One of the disheartening pieces of news recently came from PandaLabs. The security firm reported that the new strains of malware for last year numbered in the millions. That is not a typing error. There were literally many millions of pieces of new malware.

    Security company PandaLabs has claimed that it recorded more new malware in 2009 than in its 20 year history, identifying 25 million new strains in just one year compared to a total of 15 million since the company began.

    This is malicious software that wants your banking codes, wants your personal information for identity theft, wants to turn your computer into a spam spewing bot, or other such malevolent intents. If you are on the Internet, it is absolutely necessary to pay attention to online security. It is not an exaggeration to say that when you are online, your computer is at risk.

    You may be nodding in agreement and saying to yourself that you know this (hopefully because you read the security material on our sites). However, chances are that you have friends or family members who pay little to no attention to computer security. Not only do they endanger themselves… but they are also a danger to others. We are all connected online. Those people who ignore computer security are comparable to those who buy ‘products’ from spammers.

    Do a good deed, and tell these people that they should have an anti-virus, a firewall, and at least one anti-spyware program running at all times. For an anti-spyware program, we are recommending SUPERAntiSpyware. We have an excellent deal for you (and for you to recommend) that offers real time protection.

    SUPERAntiSpyware has “real-time blocking of threats! Prevent potentially harmful software from installing or re-installing! First Chance Prevention examines over 50 critical points of your system each time your system starts up and shuts down to eliminate threats before they have a chance to infect and infiltrate your system.”

    SUPERAntiSpyware will detect and remove spyware, adware, malware, Trojans, dialers, worms, keyloggers, hijackers, rootkits, and many other types of threats. This program is easy to use and it is effective. SUPERAntiSpyware is being offered at a special rate for our readers. There is a ten dollar ($10.00) saving until January 20, 2010.

    This is a program that is highly recommended within the security community. People who work on these pages use it and recommend it, too. Suggest this security program to your friends and family. The amount of malware probably will continue to increase this year. We are trying to make it as easy and as economical as possible for our readers and their friends to protect themselves and your computers.