Is TeamViewer Safe?

TeamViewer is a remote access service that allows you to share and view remote desktops with the option to take control as if you were sitting right in front of them. This would appear to be a simple solution to the eternal problem of how to provide support to friends and family without having to hop in the car and drive over. For businesses, TeamViewer can give employees an easy way to give presentations and tutorials to clients without the expense of traveling.

One question that comes to mind when considering installing this software is whether or not it’s secure enough to allow simple access to your machine while keeping unwanted parties out.

According to their official website, TeamViewer uses a method of encryption that is based on RSA private/public key exchange and AES (256 bit) session encoding. This method is used most often with https/SSL encryption relied upon by the vast majority of online merchants and banking institutions to keep their customers’ data safe, even on otherwise unsecured networks.

RSA private-public key exchange is an algorithm for public-key cryptography. Essentially, each party in the TeamViewer session generates a public and a private key. The public key is shared openly but without the private key, which would be extremely difficult to determine due to the size of each of the keys, the data transmitted between the two parties is strongly encrypted. This method also allows for a point-to-point encryption keeping the data transmitted a secret even from TeamViewer’s routing servers.

AES256 encryption is an extremely strong encryption standard originally introduced by the US government in 2001 and is one of the most secure encryption protocols in use today. While AES is an open and public cipher, it was adopted by the NSA for “Top Secret” information making it the first standard to receive that level of trust by the agency.

In addition to the redundant levels of encryption, TeamViewer also generates a session password that is unique to each software start. This means that if in some way the password was compromised, it would become useless once the software is reset.

Users on the remote computer are given a notice as soon as another user has connected, making it impossible to access the system invisibly. Also, security-specific issues, such as file transfers, require authorization from the remote machine directly to complete.

Even with all of this in place, it’s ultimately up to the user to make sure they don’t give out information on how to access their computer to anyone they don’t absolutely trust. TeamViewer is built for businesses with established trust between employees to access company machines and data. While their personal non-commercial license is currently free, giving access keys out to someone you barely know or don’t absolutely trust is no different than letting them sit in front of your computer and view all your files outright. The best rule of thumb here is if you wouldn’t let them in your home to sit at your desk and work on your computer, don’t let them do it remotely.

With this level of security surrounding TeamViewer, it would be hard to call the software completely insecure. It would appear far more likely for someone to gain unwanted access through social engineering or phishing than by brute force cracking through the encryption.

Why I Rarely Buy DVD/Blu-ray Movies Any More

There should be an image here!It’s kind of comical when you think about it. When we buy a copy of our favorite movies on DVD or Blu-ray, we like to think that we then own them, right? Not really. No, I have all but stopped buying them and instead rent movie content over Netflix or Amazon Unbox (Roku box) as it’s all I am legally allowed to do with the content anyway. I mean seriously, according to the DMCA, I am unable to make media center friendly copies onto my hard drive for local, personal use (with movies I own) because of the rules stating that I would be in the wrong due to not following the rules with regard to the content’s encryption.

Now I am a free market kind of guy. If the movie and TV industry wants to be this short sighted, awesome, more power to it. Since not enjoying the content provided is not really very practical, I simply am following its given guidelines by legally renting my content instead of “renting” the content on a disc format so they can tell me that I cannot legally make backups.

Many of you will point out that apps like Handbrake, among others, make XMBC access for my content a snap — just rip the DVDs. But the fact of the matter  is, I am not willing to do that. No, why give in to this kind of thinking when the industry has worked so hard to make sure I will never truly be able to use the content I have purchased in a way in sync with how I do things in my household? Nope. thanks to the short-sightedness of the industry, I will play by the rules and NOT spend money on buying Blu-ray DVDs any longer. Instead, I will rent them via legal sources as outlined above and let the industry remain as it is: stuck in a time warp.

It’s really too bad, because if I was allowed to rip my Blu-ray DVDs with tools like Handbrake for use on my XMBC, my media enjoyment would be complete and my weekend, a lot more fun. At least there is still Hulu Desktop hooked up to my TV, plus the benefit of music access (DRM free Amazon MP3s) accessible from my XMBC server for the time being. Then again, who’s to say how the new “non-commercial use” clause is to be interpreted, anyway? I suppose I need to get to work on my new documentary about how I like to watch legally purchased DVDs on my media center without the disc drive. Could be a real nail biter!

[awsbullet:Lawrence Lessig]

Science Historian Cracks The Plato Code

There should be an image here!Plato was the Einstein of Greece’s Golden Age and his work founded Western culture and science. Dr. Jay Kennedy’s findings are set to revolutionise the history of the origins of Western thought.

Dr. Kennedy, whose findings are published in the leading US journal Apeiron, reveals that Plato used a regular pattern of symbols, inherited from the ancient followers of Pythagoras, to give his books a musical structure. A century earlier, Pythagoras had declared that the planets and stars made an inaudible music, a ‘harmony of the spheres’. Plato imitated this hidden music in his books.

The hidden codes show that Plato anticipated the Scientific Revolution 2,000 years before Isaac Newton, discovering its most important idea — the book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. The decoded messages also open up a surprising way to unite science and religion. The awe and beauty we feel in nature, Plato says, shows that it is divine; discovering the scientific order of nature is getting closer to God. This could transform today’s culture wars between science and religion.

“Plato’s books played a major role in founding Western culture but they are mysterious and end in riddles,” Dr. Kennedy, at Manchester’s Faculty of Life Sciences explains.

“In antiquity, many of his followers said the books contained hidden layers of meaning and secret codes, but this was rejected by modern scholars.

“It is a long and exciting story, but basically I cracked the code. I have shown rigorously that the books do contain codes and symbols and that unraveling them reveals the hidden philosophy of Plato.

“This is a true discovery, not simply reinterpretation.”

This will transform the early history of Western thought, and especially the histories of ancient science, mathematics, music, and philosophy.

Dr. Kennedy spent five years studying Plato’s writing and found that in his best-known work the Republic he placed clusters of words related to music after each twelfth of the text — at one-twelfth, two-twelfths, etc. This regular pattern represented the twelve notes of a Greek musical scale. Some notes were harmonic, others dissonant. At the locations of the harmonic notes he described sounds associated with love or laughter, while the locations of dissonant notes were marked with screeching sounds or war or death. This musical code was key to cracking Plato’s entire symbolic system.

Dr. Kennedy, a researcher in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, says: “As we read his books, our emotions follow the ups and downs of a musical scale. Plato plays his readers like musical instruments.”

However Plato did not design his secret patterns purely for pleasure — it was for his own safety. Plato’s ideas were a dangerous threat to Greek religion. He said that mathematical laws and not the gods controlled the universe. Plato’s own teacher had been executed for heresy. Secrecy was normal in ancient times, especially for esoteric and religious knowledge, but for Plato it was a matter of life and death. Encoding his ideas in secret patterns was the only way to be safe.

Plato led a dramatic and fascinating life. Born four centuries before Christ, when Sparta defeated plague-ravaged Athens, he wrote 30 books and founded the world’s first university, called the Academy. He was a feminist, allowing women to study at the Academy, the first great defender of romantic love (as opposed to marriages arranged for political or financial reasons) and defended homosexuality in his books. In addition, he was captured by pirates and sold into slavery before being ransomed by friends.

Dr. Kennedy explains: “Plato’s importance cannot be overstated. He shifted humanity from a warrior society to a wisdom society. Today our heroes are Einstein and Shakespeare — and not knights in shining armour — because of him.”

Over the years Dr. Kennedy carefully peeled back layer after symbolic layer, sharing each step in lectures in Manchester and with experts in the UK and US.

He recalls: “There was no Rosetta Stone. To announce a result like this I needed rigorous, independent proofs based on crystal-clear evidence.

“The result was amazing — it was like opening a tomb and finding new set of gospels written by Jesus Christ himself.

“Plato is smiling. He sent us a time capsule.”

Dr. Kennedy’s findings are not only surprising and important; they overthrow conventional wisdom on Plato. Modern historians have always denied that there were codes; now Dr. Kennedy has proved otherwise.

He adds: “This is the beginning of something big. It will take a generation to work out the implications. All 2,000 pages contain undetected symbols.”

Mikaela Sitford @ University of Manchester

[awsbullet:Daniel Klein]

KeyScrambler Is Scrambulous!

There should be an image here!KeyScrambler is software that takes information you type and encrypts it between its path from your keyboard to the application where it ends up. I’ve been trying out the personal version as a free alternative to Kaspersky (nothing against Kaspersky, as it is still what I would recommend if you’re paying for encryption-level security).

The free version of KeyScrambler only protects Firefox and Internet Explorer, which works well for me.

So how does this help? If you have a keylogger on your computer, it will capture random, encrypted characters and won’t be able to tell what you are actually typing, hence keeping your passwords safe.

I’d give KeyScrambler 5/5, and the beauty of the free version is that it doesn’t need to run as it’s a browser add-on / extension that’s not running its own process.

My name is Stu, and I am a graduate of Business Information Technology that enjoys blogging about the latest technologies.

[Photo above by Whiskeygonebad / CC BY-ND 2.0]

Add Encrypt And Decrypt Options To The Shortcut Menu In Vista

When you want to encrypt or decrypt a folder in Windows Vista, right-click the folder and select Properties from the shortcut menu. From the Properties window, click the Advanced button on the General tab and select the Encrypt or Decrypt option. If you frequently encrypt and decrypt folders, you can add these options to a folder’s shortcut menu.

  1. Open the Registry Editor.
  2. Navigate to the following: HKEY_Current_User Software Microsoft Windows CurrentVersion Explorer Advanced.
  3. Create a new DWORD and name it EncryptionContextMenu.
  4. Set the value to 1.
  5. Close the Registry Editor.

[awsbullet:windows vista dummies]

RTMPE Spells Flash Video Protection

There should be an image here!If you’ve ever found a Flash video online that you wanted to save to your hard drive, you’ve probably found that Flash is a tricky format for downloading. It’s no accident. Even unencrypted Flash video, such as most content on YouTube, proves difficult since you can’t simply right-click to save it, as you can with an image file. Video-on-demand sites with premium content (meaning Hollywood major studio content) encrypt their Flash streams, making them even harder to grab.

To encrypt their Flash streams, content owners often rely on Adobe Protected Streaming, which uses either the RTMPE or RTMPS protocols. This article will explain what that means.

Adobe Encryption

Adobe Flash is the most common format for online video, and Protected Steaming is Adobe’s solution for content owners who want to safeguard the video they put online.

Adobe’s system takes two forms: encryption and access control. Encryption means that the data sent — the video itself — is garbled so that an unauthorized user can’t grab the stream and save the video. Videos protected by Microsoft’s Windows Media DRM are stored in an encrypted state, but Adobe Protected Streaming videos are encrypted as they’re sent, and then de-encrypted by the player.

Access control is an optional part of Protected Streaming, and it means that only allowed players can play the video. This prevents a third-party application from grabbing the stream and playing it.

For encryption, Adobe first created the RTMPS protocol, which uses SSL-encryption. “RTMP” stands for “real-time messaging protocol” and the “S” is for SSL (secure sockets layer). SSL is used to create a secure connection for the video.

RTMPE Takes Over

Starting with the Flash Media Server 3.0 and the Flash Player 9.0.115, Adobe introduced the RTMPE protocol. This replaced RTMPS because it’s simpler and faster. Content sent with it doesn’t require an SSL certificate. This protocol is also less taxing on the computer’s processor.

RTMPE is now the dominant form of Flash encryption, but you’re not going to notice which system a Web site is using when you stream a video. All the end user notices is that the video plays quickly and smoothly. If you have trouble playing protected Flash content, make sure you have the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player (found here). Your computer should prompt you to download a newer version if it’s required for the site you’re on.

You might encounter the term RTMPTE, which is similar to RTMPE, but with tunneling added. Tunneling is a system for hiding data sent over public lines, so this adds one more level of security.

Sites that Use RTMPE/RTMPS

  • Hulu: One of the fastest-growing online video sites, Hulu offers new TV shows from a variety of top-shelf Hollywood studios. The site holds strict exclusive arrangements on much of its content, preventing you from seeing it anywhere else online.
  • Vevo: This recently launched music video site is co-owned by Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group.
  • YouTube: While most video on the online video giant is unencrypted, some major studio content is RTMPE encrypted.

When people can’t save encrypted videos to their hard drive using easier methods, they often turn to screen capture programs, which avoid the whole encryption issue by simply recording the images that show on a computer screen.

Troy Dreier is a well-known technology writer specializing in audio and video hardware and software. He contributes to Laptop, Computer Shopper, Streaming Media, and other Web sites. Troy was previously a staff editor at PC Magazine.

[Photo above by KTDEE / CC BY-ND 2.0]

Add Encrypt And Decrypt Options To The Shortcut Menu In Vista

When you want to encrypt or decrypt a folder in Windows Vista, right-click the folder and select Properties from the shortcut menu. From the Properties window, click the Advanced button on the General tab and select the Encrypt or Decrypt option. If you frequently encrypt and decrypt folders, you can add these options to a folder’s shortcut menu.

  1. Open the Registry Editor.
  2. Navigate to the following: HKEY_Current_User Software Microsoft Windows CurrentVersion Explorer Advanced.
  3. Create a new DWORD and name it EncryptionContextMenu.
  4. Set the value to 1.
  5. Close the Registry Editor.

An Extended Offer (And Apology)

There should be an image here!Last week, we posted an offer to our readers about a security encryption program, SafeBit. There was a forty percent reduction to their usual price for the people who frequent these pages. Our write-up can be found here.

Because of very bad timing and the issue with coordinating over many different time zones, we learned too late that the program does work with Windows 7. The memo states: “it is compatible with the 32 bit version of Windows 7.”

The good news is that the SafeBit people are extending their generous offer until April 25th, 2010. Now there is no reason for our Windows 7 people to miss out on this offer. Thanks to the people at SafeBit for all their effort and for looking out for the Windows 7 users.

We’re Not Ignoring Windows 7 Users

There should be an image here!Last week, we posted an offer to our readers about a security encryption program, SafeBit. There was a forty percent reduction to their usual price for the people who frequent these pages. Our write-up can be found here.

Because of very bad timing and the issue with coordinating over many different time zones, we learned too late that the program does work with Windows 7. The memo states: “it is compatible with the 32 bit version of Windows 7.”

The good news is that the SafeBit people are extending their generous offer until April 25th, 2010. Now there is no reason for our Windows 7 people to miss out on this offer. Thanks to the people at SafeBit for all their effort and for looking out for the Windows 7 users.

SafeBit Is A Safe Bet

There should be an image here!In 2008, there was some published data about how many laptops were lost or stolen each week at U.S. airports. The number was staggering. The 2008 research put the number at over 10,000 laptops per week. With the increasing popularity of netbooks, as well as the wide use of laptops, the numbers now may exceed the 2008 findings. And that is just airport data.

When those figures are combined with home thefts, the numbers must be impressive — in a bad way. Not only is the hardware valuable, but the information on those machines could lead to even more problems. For example, most computers have personal information on them. This is especially true as people are doing their tax returns. If that information falls into the wrong hands, then there is a real concern for identity theft.

We encourage our readers to use security software. As much as the security firms try, they are usually one step behind the hackers. No security firm says that their software gives one hundred percent protection — they simply can’t. The Internet is too dynamic and things are happening too fast.

Because of disasters like a stolen/lost laptop or a hacker penetrating security, there should be a final layer of protection — and that is encryption. Encryption may seem like an extreme measure that will make it difficult for the user it’s meant to protect, but this is simply a myth. Encryption is not difficult, and it is not only for the geeky.

One simple, effective program that is recommended for encryption is SafeBit:

SafeBit Disk Encryption is the perfect electronic vault you need for your privacy. It features military strength on-the-fly encryption, by creating virtual disk drives, where you can hide files and folders, keep them encrypted all them time, but still work with these files just like you work with normal files. SafeBit is the last line of defense if your current security system fails against viruses, trojans or hacker attacks.”

This is a very special offer for our readers. The SafeBit people are offering our readers a generous forty percent (40%) discount off their regular price. This is a remarkable saving on an award winning software program.

Use this link to get SafeBit at its discounted rate.

This offer expires on April 21st, 2010. SafeBit works on 32-bit versions of Windows 2K/NT/XP/Vista.

If your computer is lost or stolen, then the information is safe. Encryption theoretically can be broken, but it may take years of sophisticated effort. Most thieves will not bother, and the data likely would be wiped and the stolen machine sold. When you know that the information on the missing machine is safe, it makes the disaster of the missing laptop, netbook, or even desktop somewhat easier to take.

Here is just one last reminder for the people who will be traveling with their laptops. If you are using different Wi-Fi connections regularly or plugging in to unfamiliar Internet connections, there is the risk of keyloggers. For example, the keylogger would record your name and password when you enter a site like PayPal. That would be comparable to handing over the log-in data to your online account. SafeBit has a virtual keyboard, which will give protection from such keylogger programs and password stealing malware. The virtual keyboard feature alone is worth the generous price of this program.

Thanks to the SafeBit people for offering this program to our readers at this price point.

Protect Yourself From Malware Disasters

There should be an image here!In 2008, there was some published data about how many laptops were lost or stolen each week at U.S. airports. The number was staggering. The 2008 research put the number at over 10,000 laptops per week. With the increasing popularity of netbooks, as well as the wide use of laptops, the numbers now may exceed the 2008 findings. And that is just airport data.

When those figures are combined with home thefts, the numbers must be impressive — in a bad way. Not only is the hardware valuable, but the information on those machines could lead to even more problems. For example, most computers have personal information on them. This is especially true as people are doing their tax returns. If that information falls into the wrong hands, then there is a real concern for identity theft.

We encourage our readers to use security software. As much as the security firms try, they are usually one step behind the hackers. No security firm says that their software gives one hundred percent protection — they simply can’t. The Internet is too dynamic and things are happening too fast.

Because of disasters like a stolen/lost laptop or a hacker penetrating security, there should be a final layer of protection — and that is encryption. Encryption may seem like an extreme measure that will make it difficult for the user it’s meant to protect, but this is simply a myth. Encryption is not difficult, and it is not only for the geeky.

One simple, effective program that is recommended for encryption is SafeBit:

SafeBit Disk Encryption is the perfect electronic vault you need for your privacy. It features military strength on-the-fly encryption, by creating virtual disk drives, where you can hide files and folders, keep them encrypted all them time, but still work with these files just like you work with normal files. SafeBit is the last line of defense if your current security system fails against viruses, trojans or hacker attacks.”

This is a very special offer for our readers. The SafeBit people are offering our readers a generous forty percent (40%) discount off their regular price. This is a remarkable saving on an award winning software program.

Use this link to get SafeBit at its discounted rate.

This offer expires on April 21st, 2010. SafeBit works on 32-bit versions of Windows 2K/NT/XP/Vista.

If your computer is lost or stolen, then the information is safe. Encryption theoretically can be broken, but it may take years of sophisticated effort. Most thieves will not bother, and the data likely would be wiped and the stolen machine sold. When you know that the information on the missing machine is safe, it makes the disaster of the missing laptop, netbook, or even desktop somewhat easier to take.

Here is just one last reminder for the people who will be traveling with their laptops. If you are using different Wi-Fi connections regularly or plugging in to unfamiliar Internet connections, there is the risk of keyloggers. For example, the keylogger would record your name and password when you enter a site like PayPal. That would be comparable to handing over the log-in data to your online account. SafeBit has a virtual keyboard, which will give protection from such keylogger programs and password stealing malware. The virtual keyboard feature alone is worth the generous price of this program.

Thanks to the SafeBit people for offering this program to our readers at this price point.

Privacy In Plain Sight

There should be an image here!Your computer most likely holds the necessary data sufficient for successful identity theft. All that is needed for identity theft to occur is to tie a social security number to a name. If you access sites like PayPal or your bank account, those personal data become readily available. Having your identity compromised is simply a personal nightmare that can take years to resolve.

The data on identity theft show that, many times, the crime is perpetrated by someone that the victim knows. That means that it is critical to protect your computer files from people that you know. It might be a roommate, a repair person, a classmate, a co-worker… someone who may and can have casual access to your desktop, laptop, and/or netbook.

In addition to that personal data, you might want to keep photos, passwords, music, videos, and other such files away from other prying eyes. These files represent your privacy.

We recommend Invisible Secrets for a number of security and privacy reasons:

“… Invisible Secrets 4 not only encrypts your data and files for safe keeping or for secure transfer across the net, it also hides them in places that on the surface appear totally innocent, such as picture or sound files, or Web pages. These types of files are a perfect disguise for sensitive information. Using our file encryption software nobody, not even your wife, boss, or a hacker would realize that your important papers or letters are stored in your last holiday pictures, or that you use your personal Web page to exchange messages or secret documents. With Invisible Secrets 4 file encryption software, you may encrypt and hide files directly from Windows Explorer, and then automatically transfer them by email or via the Internet.”

We have Invisible Secrets available to our readers at a 40% discount from this link.

Invisible Secrets works on Windows NT / 2000 /,P / Vista and Windows 7. This generous offer ends March 10, 2010.

Cisco Systems uses this program. The Drug Enforcement Administration (USA) uses this program. The Exchange Bank uses this program. McCain Foods Limited uses this program. The program is Invisible Secrets and the client list grows. Privacy and security are important to these companies and institutions — it is essential to computer protection. This is a preventative measure that individual computer users have to recognize because there is so much information on just one hard drive.

This program should be standard on every machine. With business laptops, government laptops, and personal laptops going missing every day, this security program should be on every portable machine, as well as desktop. This would provide an enormous saving for sensitive information that is breached and the subsequent nightmare of paying for identity theft protection. It’s simple and it’s effective.

Let’s look at just one feature of this program. There are situations where you might be concerned that about keylogging programs stealing your keyboard entries. For example, you might be using an unfamiliar Wi-Fi connection. Invisible Secrets provides a virtual keyboard that prevents criminal access to what you type. This safeguards your passwords and access to sites like PayPal. This is only one of the many benefits of this program.

And this is something that travelers might consider: what if airport security confiscated your laptop? It is absolutely frightening, but it can happen.

If you are in need of multiples of this program, please let us know. We will try to negotiate a good price for those companies that might need many copies for laptops holding those confidential files. For the individual user, think of the files, emails, pictures, passwords, and other bits of information that you don’t want people to access. That is exactly why we want this privacy/security program for our readers… and our thanks to the Invisible Secrets people for this kind offer.

A Program To Protect Your Privacy

There should be an image here!Your computer most likely holds the necessary data sufficient for successful identity theft. All that is needed for identity theft to occur is to tie a social security number to a name. If you access sites like PayPal or your bank account, those personal data become readily available. Having your identity compromised is simply a personal nightmare that can take years to resolve.

The data on identity theft show that, many times, the crime is perpetrated by someone that the victim knows. That means that it is critical to protect your computer files from people that you know. It might be a roommate, a repair person, a classmate, a co-worker… someone who may and can have casual access to your desktop, laptop, and/or netbook.

In addition to that personal data, you might want to keep photos, passwords, music, videos, and other such files away from other prying eyes. These files represent your privacy.

We recommend Invisible Secrets for a number of security and privacy reasons:

“… Invisible Secrets 4 not only encrypts your data and files for safe keeping or for secure transfer across the net, it also hides them in places that on the surface appear totally innocent, such as picture or sound files, or Web pages. These types of files are a perfect disguise for sensitive information. Using our file encryption software nobody, not even your wife, boss, or a hacker would realize that your important papers or letters are stored in your last holiday pictures, or that you use your personal Web page to exchange messages or secret documents. With Invisible Secrets 4 file encryption software, you may encrypt and hide files directly from Windows Explorer, and then automatically transfer them by email or via the Internet.”

We have Invisible Secrets available to our readers at a 40% discount from this link.

Invisible Secrets works on Windows NT / 2000 / XP / Vista and Windows 7. This generous offer ends March 10, 2010.

Cisco Systems uses this program. The Drug Enforcement Administration (USA) uses this program. The Exchange Bank uses this program. McCain Foods Limited uses this program. The program is Invisible Secrets and the client list grows. Privacy and security are important to these companies and institutions — it is essential to computer protection. This is a preventative measure that individual computer users have to recognize because there is so much information on just one hard drive.

This program should be standard on every machine. With business laptops, government laptops, and personal laptops going missing every day, this security program should be on every portable machine, as well as desktop. This would provide an enormous saving for sensitive information that is breached and the subsequent nightmare of paying for identity theft protection. It’s simple and it’s effective.

Let’s look at just one feature of this program. There are situations where you might be concerned that about keylogging programs stealing your keyboard entries. For example, you might be using an unfamiliar Wi-Fi connection. Invisible Secrets provides a virtual keyboard that prevents criminal access to what you type. This safeguards your passwords and access to sites like PayPal. This is only one of the many benefits of this program.

And this is something that travelers might consider: what if airport security confiscated your laptop? It is absolutely frightening, but it can happen.

If you are in need of multiples of this program, please let us know. We will try to negotiate a good price for those companies that might need many copies for laptops holding those confidential files. For the individual user, think of the files, emails, pictures, passwords, and other bits of information that you don’t want people to access. That is exactly why we want this privacy/security program for our readers… and our thanks to the Invisible Secrets people for this kind offer.

Gnomie Discount For SafeBit Disk Encryption

Identity theft has been tagged as being the fastest growing crime in America. Your private information is a commodity that some criminals harvest and resell. It is a whole subculture. The people stealing the personal information may not bother with committing the actual identity theft, but there are buyers for your personal information.

One of the best ways to protect yourself is to encrypt your computer information. Encryption has been advocated for years by the security people, such as our very own Kat. And we agree that it is an effective means of protecting your information. Encryption is an extra layer of protection. Somehow, there is a common belief that encryption is difficult and totally geekish. It really isn’t. SafeBit Disk Encryption makes it easy:

SafeBit features on-the-fly disk encryption, by creating encrypted virtual disk drives, where you can hide files and folders, keep them encrypted all the time, but still work with these files just like you work with normal files. Disk Encryption is transparent to the user…

This program is efficient and easy to use. It effectively provides security and stays out of your way. It really is non-intrusive. And, to encourage you to protect your sensitive data and to keep our readers safe, the SafeBit people are being kind and offering our readers an unbelievable discount of forty percent (40%) off the normal price.

This is an exclusive, time-limited offer that is available to our readers. It is a fifteen dollar savings. It expires on October 28, 2009. Safebit supports 32-bit versions of Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT.

In terms of security, there are three more things that need to be said. Often identity theft is not perpetrated by a stranger. It can be someone you know and that someone has access to your personal data. The second point is that you may have all the security software protection ever recommended on your machine. You may be protecting yourself from malware, spyware, Trojans, rootkits and all that other computer trash. An infection still can compromise your computer. No security software program dares to offer a hundred percent protection. It just takes one mistaken click. You are tired sometimes, focused on other things, and make a mistake. We all do that and hackers count on that. And then there are drive by infections that don’t require you to do anything except visit a site.

And finally, what happens if you lose or have your machine stolen? For example, missing/stolen laptops are reported every day. Then, all your confidential information is available to whoever is powering up your machine. And this security breach leads to identity theft. This type of encryption should be on every business and government laptop. [Give a shout if you want this program in high volume. We will see what we can do for you.]

The other thing is that there is no backdoor. None. The SafeBit Disk Encryption people state this clearly. The software does NOT include any backdoor. Neither the vendor nor any other entities are able to break the SafeBit Disk encryption. You must remember your password. There is no two ways about it. The vendor is not going to be able to save you. Again, you must remember the password. The program really is that good. Losing your machine may be costly but losing the confidential personal information on that computer may mean possibly long term anguish. SafeBit is just an efficient, easy way to protect yourself.

Don’t Be Scared This Halloween – Let The Encryption Keeper Help!

Identity theft has been tagged as being the fastest growing crime in America. Your private information is a commodity that some criminals harvest and resell. It is a whole subculture. The people stealing the personal information may not bother with committing the actual identity theft, but there are buyers for your personal information.

One of the best ways to protect yourself is to encrypt your computer information. Encryption has been advocated for years by the security people, such as our very own Kat. And we agree that it is an effective means of protecting your information. Encryption is an extra layer of protection. Somehow, there is a common belief that encryption is difficult and totally geekish. It really isn’t. SafeBit Disk Encryption makes it easy:

SafeBit features on-the-fly disk encryption, by creating encrypted virtual disk drives, where you can hide files and folders, keep them encrypted all the time, but still work with these files just like you work with normal files. Disk Encryption is transparent to the user…

This program is efficient and easy to use. It effectively provides security and stays out of your way. It really is non-intrusive. And, to encourage you to protect your sensitive data and to keep our readers safe, the SafeBit people are being kind and offering our readers an unbelievable discount of forty percent (40%) off the normal price.

This is an exclusive, time-limited offer that is available to our readers. It is a fifteen dollar savings. It expires on October 28, 2009. Safebit supports 32-bit versions of Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT.

In terms of security, there are three more things that need to be said. Often identity theft is not perpetrated by a stranger. It can be someone you know and that someone has access to your personal data. The second point is that you may have all the security software protection ever recommended on your machine. You may be protecting yourself from malware, spyware, Trojans, rootkits and all that other computer trash. An infection still can compromise your computer. No security software program dares to offer a hundred percent protection. It just takes one mistaken click. You are tired sometimes, focused on other things, and make a mistake. We all do that and hackers count on that. And then there are drive by infections that don’t require you to do anything except visit a site.

And finally, what happens if you lose or have your machine stolen? For example, missing/stolen laptops are reported every day. Then, all your confidential information is available to whoever is powering up your machine. And this security breach leads to identity theft. This type of encryption should be on every business and government laptop. [Give a shout if you want this program in high volume. We will see what we can do for you.]

The other thing is that there is no backdoor. None. The SafeBit Disk Encryption people state this clearly. The software does NOT include any backdoor. Neither the vendor nor any other entities are able to break the SafeBit Disk encryption. You must remember your password. There is no two ways about it. The vendor is not going to be able to save you. Again, you must remember the password. The program really is that good. Losing your machine may be costly but losing the confidential personal information on that computer may mean possibly long term anguish. SafeBit is just an efficient, easy way to protect yourself.