Adam Machanic Does SQL In Parallel

There should be an image here!In this RunAs Radio podcast, Richard talks to Adam Machanic about parallelism in SQL Server. Executing queries in parallel has been in SQL Server since version 7, but with the number of cores in servers rising dramatically, parallelism is more and more important. Adam digs into the details of how to make parallelism in SQL Server work effectively. Check out Adam’s blog here.

Adam Machanic is a Boston-based independent database consultant, writer, and speaker. He has been involved in dozens of SQL Server implementations for both high-availability OLTP and large-scale data warehouse applications, and has optimized data access layer performance for several data-intensive applications. Adam has written for numerous web sites and magazines, including SQLblog, Simple Talk, Search SQL Server, SQL Server Professional, CoDe, and VSJ. He has also contributed to several books on SQL Server, including SQL Server 2008 Internals (Microsoft Press, 2009) and Expert SQL Server 2005 Development (Apress, 2007). Adam regularly speaks at user groups, community events, and conferences on a variety of SQL Server and .NET-related topics. He is a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) for SQL Server, Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP), and a member of the INETA North American Speakers Bureau.

[awsbullet:Adam Machanic]

Kim Tripp And Paul Randal Talk About Learning Effectively

In this RunAs Radio podcast, Richard and I talk to Kim Tripp and Paul Randal about how people can learn effectively.

The discussion ranges over the different vehicles of learning, including user groups, training classes, conference sessions, and so on. Kim and Paul have taught in all these mediums and have great pointers for what you can do to select the right sort of medium and things you can do to get the most from it.

There should be an image here!Paul S. Randal is the Managing Director of SQLskills.com, which he runs with his wife Kimberly L. Tripp. Paul started in the industry in 1994 working for DEC on the VMS file system and its check/repair tools (the equivalent of chkdsk for NTFS. In 1999 he moved to Microsoft to work on SQL Server, specifically on DBCC. For SQL Server 2000, he concentrated on index fragmentation – well, removing it! – writing both DBCC INDEXDEFRAG and DBCC SHOWCONTIG, plus various algorithms in DBCC CHECKDB to support it being able to run online.

Paul then spent the first 3 years of SQL Server 2005 development rewriting the DBCC CHECKDB and repair code-base, gaining extensive insight into disaster recovery scenarios and problems through close partnership with the SQL Server PSS (Product Support) group. Paul spent the remaining two years of SQL Server 2005 development leading/managing a 9-person development team in the Core Storage Engine. His team was responsible for data access and storage (DBCC, space allocation, indexes & heaps, pages & records, text/LOB storage, snapshot isolation, bulk load etc). For SQL Server 2008, Paul decided to put his customer passion to better use and switch to a Program Management role within the Storage Engine team – first with responsibility for the entire Storage Engine for a year, and then with a narrower, more hands-on focus on the Core Storage Engine. This involved both feature set definition plus customer and partner engagements.

It was during this phase of Paul’s career that he first started public speaking, with his first session being on DBCC Internals at TechEd US 2006. This was also where he met Kimberly, and they were subsequently married July 29th 2007. In 2007, after 8.5 years on the SQL Server team, Paul left Microsoft to join Kimberly running SQLskills.com and pursuing his new-found passion for presenting and consulting. Paul regularly presents at conferences and user groups around the world on high-availability, disaster recovery, database maintenance, and Storage Engine internals. His popular blog can be found here.

There should be an image here!Kimberly L. Tripp is an SQL Server MVP and a Microsoft Regional Director and has worked with computers since 1985. Her career with database technologies began with IBM in 1988 and with Microsoft SQL Server in 1990. Since 1995, Kimberly has worked as a Speaker, Writer, Trainer and Consultant for her own company SYSolutions, Inc. (aka SQLskills.com).

Kimberly is a writer/editor for SQL Server Magazine; was a founding writer for T-SQL Solutions magazine; was a technical contributor for the SQL Server 2000 Resource Kit; and co-authored the MSPress title SQL Server 2000 High Availability Kimberly has presented lectures and seminars at Microsoft Tech*Ed and other SQL Server-related events since 1996 and is consistently top-rated both on quality of technical content and presentation style.

Kimberly regularly consults with customers to help them tackle their availability and performance issues as well as works with Microsoft to provide new and interesting technical resources including the SQL Server 2000 High Availability DVD. The HA DVD was a great experience where Microsoft funded the recording, production and duplication for a DVD with roughly 9.5 hours of content covering SQL Server 2000 High Availability technology such as Log Shipping, Backup/Restore, Clustering and Administration.

This DVD is available from your Microsoft contact; the part number is 098-96661. Currently, Kimberly is working to help create SQL Server 2005 (code-named “Yukon”) content including white papers, course materials, and labs. Prior to starting SYSolutions, Inc. in 1995, Kimberly held positions at Microsoft including Subject Matter Expert/Trainer for Microsoft University and Technical Writer for the SQL Server Development Team.

[awsbullet:SQL Server Magazine]

The Manga Guide to Databases

There should be an image here!Want to learn about databases without the tedium? With its unique combination of Japanese-style comics and serious educational content, The Manga Guide to Databases is just the book for you.

Princess Ruruna is stressed out. With the king and queen away, she has to manage the Kingdom of Kod’s humongous fruit-selling empire. Overseas departments, scads of inventory, conflicting prices, and so many customers! It’s all such a confusing mess. But a mysterious book and a helpful fairy promise to solve her organizational problems — with the practical magic of databases.

In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication.

Examples and exercises (with answer keys) help you learn, and an appendix of frequently used SQL statements gives the tools you need to create and maintain full-featured databases.

97 Things Every SQL Developer Should Know

There should be an image here!When you need quick answers for working with SQL, why rummage around the Web when you can get advice from two-dozen experts in one concise reference? 97 Things Every SQL Developer Should Know provides short and extremely practical tips from some of the world’s most experienced SQL developers. You’ll learn how these pros deal with everything from architecture and database design to programming strategies and performance issues.

Exploit strengths and work around weaknesses in the operating system and database server. Learn how to efficiently design and code multi-user, high-throughput systems. Understand how to improve performance and maintainability, and more. This book is perfect for browsing, with its 97 tips grouped into sections that include:

  • The basics, including what you need to know about locking and concurrency
  • Hardware: Is Unix or Windows is better for databases, and why?
  • Architecture, including 2-Phase commits and when they’re needed
  • Database design: Learn the difference between logical and physical modeling
  • Programming strategies, such as how to use functions as data sources
  • Administrative: Design a strategy for removing unwanted data, and more
  • Tips for specific database products, including Oracle, SQL Server, and MySQL

The Manga Guide To Databases

There should be an image here!Want to learn about databases without the tedium? With its unique combination of Japanese-style comics and serious educational content, The Manga Guide to Databases is just the book for you.

Princess Ruruna is stressed out. With the king and queen away, she has to manage the Kingdom of Kod’s humongous fruit-selling empire. Overseas departments, scads of inventory, conflicting prices, and so many customers! It’s all such a confusing mess. But a mysterious book and a helpful fairy promise to solve her organizational problems-with the practical magic of databases.

In The Manga Guide to Databases, Tico the fairy teaches the Princess how to simplify her data management. We follow along as they design a relational database, understand the entity-relationship model, perform basic database operations, and delve into more advanced topics. Once the Princess is familiar with transactions and basic SQL statements, she can keep her data timely and accurate for the entire kingdom. Finally, Tico explains ways to make the database more efficient and secure, and they discuss methods for concurrency and replication.

Examples and exercises (with answer keys) help you learn, and an appendix of frequently used SQL statements gives the tools you need to create and maintain full-featured databases.

Brent Ozar Puts SQL In The Cloud

In this RunAs Radio podcast, Richard and I talk to Brent Ozar from Quest Software about running SQL in the cloud.

Part of the conversation focuses on SQL Azure, but Amazon’s EC2 running SQL on a virtual machine is also a version of the same concept. The larger topic is really around DBAs providing services to their organizations — because that’s what the cloud is offering!

Brent Ozar is a SQL Server Expert with Quest Software, and a Microsoft SQL Server MVP. Brent has a decade of broad IT experience, including management of multi-terabyte data warehouses, storage area networks and virtualization. In his current role, Brent specializes in performance tuning, disaster recovery and automating SQL Server management. Previously, Brent spent two years at Southern Wine & Spirits, a Miami-based wine and spirits distributor. He has experience conducting training sessions, has written several technical articles, and blogs prolifically at BrentOzar.com. He is a regular speaker at PASS events, editor-in-chief of SQLServerPedia.com, and co-author of the book, “Professional SQL Server 2008 Internals and Troubleshooting.”

[awsbullet:Professional SQL Server 2008]

Buck Woody Organizes Us With SQL CMS

In this RunAs Radio podcast, Richard and I talk to Buck Woody about SQL CMS, a tool he’s contributed to codeplex. SQL CMS is actually a collection of tools that together provide content management of SQL Server and other servers in your network, allowing you to identify different servers, who’s responsible for managing them, their current status and details of their configuration. It’s a great synergy of tools built into SQL Server 2008, accelerators like MAPS and EPM — Enterprise Policy Management Framework, another project on codeplex.

Buck Woody has been working with Information Technology since 1981. He has worked for the U.S. Air Force, at an IBM reseller as technical support, and for NASA as well as U.S. Space Command as an IT contractor. He has worked in most all IT positions from computer repair technician to system and database administrator, and from network technician to IT Manager. But it is the database field he always returns to. He has been a DBA and Database Developer on everything from an Oracle system running on a VAX to SQL Server and DB2 installations. Buck has a business degree and several industry certifications, including MCSE, MCDBA and Brainbench DBA. He is the author of over 300 SQL Server articles and four published SQL Server books; he is the site personality on InformIT.com’s SQL Web, and was the President of the Tampa SQL User’s Group for 5 years.

He was awarded the Microsoft MVP Award in 2006 for SQL Server, and started work in the SQL Server Team at Microsoft a year later. He has over twenty years extensive professional and practical experience in computer networks and network design. Experienced in design and management of business and technical systems, as well as marketing and training those systems to the user community and corporate officers.

Oracle PL/SQL Programming, Fifth Edition

There should be an image here!Oracle PL/SQL Programming, Fifth Edition is the definitive reference on PL/SQL, considered throughout the database community to be the best Oracle programming book available. Like its predecessors, this fifth edition of Oracle PL/SQL Programming covers language fundamentals, advanced coding techniques, and best practices for using Oracle’s powerful procedural language. Thoroughly updated for Oracle Database 11g Release 2, this edition reveals new PL/SQL features and provides extensive code samples, ranging from simple examples to complex and complete applications, in the book and on the companion Web site.

This indispensable reference for both novices and experienced Oracle programmers will help you:

  • Get PL/SQL programs up and running quickly, with clear instructions for executing, tracing, testing, debugging, and managing PL/SQL code
  • Optimize PL/SQL performance with the aid of a brand-new chapter in the fifth edition
  • Explore datatypes, conditional and sequential control statements, loops, exception handling, security features, globalization and localization issues, and the PL/SQL architecture
  • Understand and use new Oracle Database 11g features, including the edition-based redefinition capability, the function result cache, the new CONTINUE statement, fine-grained dependency tracking, sequences in PL/SQL expressions, supertype invocation from subtypes, and enhancements to native compilation, triggers, and dynamic SQL
  • Use new Oracle Database 11g tools and techniques such as PL/Scope, the PL/SQL hierarchical profiler, and the SecureFiles technology for large objects
  • Build modular PL/SQL applications using procedures, functions, triggers, and packages

Jessica Moss Reports On SQL Server Reporting Services

In this RunAs Radio podcast, Richard and I talk to Jessica Moss about SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS). SSRS can replace typical reporting products like Crystal Reports, but also provides a tool for having users build their own reports. The conversation also moves into the Business Intelligence side of reporting, looking at how SSRS works with Analysis Services to provide a deeper level of reporting.

Jessica M. Moss, a Microsoft SQL Server MVP and business intelligence mentor with Solid Quality Mentors, is certified as an MCDBA, MCTS: SQL Server 2005 BI, and an MCITP: SQL Server 2005 BI. She has been working with SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2008 since their releases and has participated in many warehousing and reporting solutions. Jessica enjoys working with the local community and is a regular speaker at user groups, code camps, and conferences. You can read about her work on her blog.

[awsbullet:sql+server+data]

Entity Developer Express v2.00

Entity Developer Express is a powerful freeware LINQ to SQL modeling and code generation tool.

You can design LINQ to SQL entity models from scratch or reverse-engineer an existing database, in which case you will have the classes and the relations with just several clicks.

Entity Developer for SQL Server uses standard Microsoft SqlClient, LINQ to SQL, and Entity Framework, all of them bundled with .NET Framework 3.5 SP1.

[3M] [WinXP/Vista] [FREE]

[awsbullet:sqlserver]

Learning SQL, Second Edition

There should be an image here!Although SQL is an old language, it’s going to be around for a lot longer, and has a bright future in store, says author Alan Beaulieu. “Properly designed, a relational database can handle huge amounts of data, and SQL is a language for generating, manipulating, and retrieving data from such a relational database,” explains Beaulieu in the new edition of Learning SQL. “When working with large data sets, SQL is akin to one of those snazzy digital cameras with high-power zoom lens in that you can use SQL to look at large sets of data, or you can zoom in on individual rows (or anywhere in between).

“Other database management systems tend to break down under heavy loads because their focus is too narrow (the zoom lens is stuck on maximum),” Beaulieu continues, “which is why attempts to dethrone relational databases and SQL have largely failed. Therefore, even though SQL is an old language, it is going to be around for a lot longer and has a bright future in store.”

Updated for the latest database management systems — including MySQL 6.0, Oracle 11g, and Microsoft’s SQL Server 2008 — Beaulieu’s guide will get you up and running with SQL quickly. Whether you need to write database applications, perform administrative tasks, or generate reports, Learning SQL will help you easily master all the SQL fundamentals.

Each chapter presents a self-contained lesson on a key SQL concept or technique, with numerous illustrations and annotated examples. Exercises at the end of each chapter let you practice the skills you learn. With this book, you will:

  1. Move quickly through SQL basics and learn several advanced features
  2. Use SQL data statements to generate, manipulate, and retrieve data
  3. Create database objects, such as tables, indexes, and constraints, using SQL schema statements
  4. Learn how data sets interact with queries, and understand the importance of subqueries
  5. Convert and manipulate data with SQL’s built-in functions, and use conditional logic in data statements

Knowledge of SQL is a must for interacting with data. With Learning SQL, you’ll quickly learn how to put the power and flexibility of this language to work.

Kim Tripp On The Roles Of Developers And DBAs With The Database

Richard and I talk to Kim Tripp about how developers and DBAs inter-relate around SQL Server. Kim tells a story of how she encountered developers who saw SQL Server as a “set it and forget it” technology. What should the relationship between developers, DBAs, and database be? We tackle the topic!

Kimberly L. Tripp is an SQL Server MVP and a Microsoft Regional Director and has worked with computers since 1985. Her career with database technologies began with IBM in 1988 and with Microsoft SQL Server in 1990. Since 1995, Kimberly has worked as a Speaker, Writer, Trainer and Consultant for her own company SYSolutions, Inc. (aka SQLskills.com). Kimberly is a writer/editor for SQL Server Magazine; was a founding writer for T-SQL Solutions magazine; was a technical contributor for the SQL Server 2000 Resource Kit; and co-authored the MSPress title SQL Server 2000 High Availability.

Kimberly has presented lectures and seminars at Microsoft Tech*Ed and other SQL Server-related events since 1996 and is consistently top-rated both on quality of technical content and presentation style. Kimberly regularly consults with customers to help them tackle their availability and performance issues as well as works with Microsoft to provide new and interesting technical resources including the SQL Server 2000 High Availability DVD. The HA DVD was a great experience where Microsoft funded the recording, production and duplication for a DVD with roughly 9.5 hours of content covering SQL Server 2000 High Availability technology such as Log Shipping, Backup/Restore, Clustering and Administration. This DVD is available from your Microsoft contact; the part number is 098-96661.

Currently, Kimberly is working to help create SQL Server 2005 (code-named “Yukon”) content including whitepapers, course materials, and labs. Prior to starting SYSolutions, Inc. in 1995, Kimberly held positions at Microsoft including Subject Matter Expert/Trainer for Microsoft University and Technical Writer for the SQL Server Development Team.

Bill Graziano Tunes Up Our SQL Server Queries

Richard and I talk to Bill Graziano about performance tuning in SQL Server. Bill digs into using SQL Profiler to focus on where the problems lie. The discussion digs into the procedure cache and how you can optimize your queries for caching. He also talks about ClearTrace, a free tool he distributes to help understand trace data. Check it out here.

Bill Graziano specializes in SQL Server performance tuning and server management. Bill has nearly twenty years of database management experience. He started working with Sybase on a Unix platform back before it became Microsoft SQL Server. He’s worked with every version of SQL Server Microsoft has released. Bill has been a Microsoft MVP for SQL Server for four years. He is on the Board of Directors for PASS, the global user group for SQL Server professionals, where he is the Vice President of Marketing. Bill is a regular presenter at the PASS conference and various user groups. Bill formerly worked for accenture and Empower Trainers & Consultants.

[rsslist:http://shop.tagjag.com/SQL+Server]

Bob Beauchemin Locates Us With Spatial Data In SQL Server 2008

Richard and I talk to Bob Beauchemin about the new spatial data features in SQL Server 2008. Don’t think you have spatial data in your database? Bob explains how every address can be spatial data. Check out Bob’s blog here.

Bob Beauchemin is a database-centric application practitioner and architect, instructor, course author, writer, and Developer Skills Partner for SQLskills. Over the past few years he’s been writing and teaching his SQL Server 2005 and 2008 courses to students worldwide through the Ascend program, the Metro (SQL Server 2008 Jumpstart) program, and client-centric classes. He is lead author of the books A Developer’s Guide to SQL Server 2005 and A First Look at SQL Server 2005 For Developers, author of Essential ADO.NET and has written articles on SQL Server and other databases, database security, ADO.NET, and OLE DB for MSDN, SQL Server Magazine, and others.

SQL And Relational Theory

There should be an image here!SQL is ubiquitous, but it’s hard to use. “It’s complicated, confusing, and error prone — much more so, I venture to suggest, than its apologists would have you believe,” says C.J. Date. “In order to have any hope of writing SQL code that you can be sure is accurate, therefore (meaning it does exactly what it’s supposed to do, no more and no less), you must follow some appropriate discipline.” The thesis of Date’s new book, SQL and Relational Theory, is that using SQL relationally is the discipline you need. But what does this mean? Isn’t SQL relational anyway?

The fact is, understanding SQL’s underlying theory is the best way to guarantee that your SQL code is correct and your database schema is robust and maintainable. On the other hand, if you’re not well versed in the theory, you can fall into several traps. In SQL and Relational Theory, Date demonstrates how you can apply relational theory directly to your use of SQL. With numerous examples and clear explanations of the reasoning behind them, you’ll learn how to deal with common SQL dilemmas, such as:

  • Should database access granted be through views instead of base tables? 
  • Nulls in your database are causing you to get wrong answers. Why? What can you do about it?
  • Could you write an SQL query to find employees who have never been in the same department for more than six months at a time?
  • SQL supports “quantified comparisons,” but they’re better avoided. Why? How do you avoid them?
  • Constraints are crucially important, but most SQL products don’t support them properly. What can you do to resolve this situation?

Database theory and practice have evolved since E. F. Codd originally defined the relational model back in 1969. Independent of any SQL products, SQL and Relational Theory draws on decades of research to present the most up-to-date treatment of the material available anywhere. Anyone with a modest to advanced background in SQL will benefit from the many insights in this book.